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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
Kev the Modeller
#101 Posted : 31 October 2021 23:15:49

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Looking good as always Robin, There's more 'scratching' going on here than on a flea bitten dog! You're gonna end up with more scratchbuilt parts than standard kit parts by the time this is finished, but I'm sure it will be very much worth the extra effort when you have a very detailed model that looks so much better than the standard build!?

Very well done and many thanks for the doff of your cap regarding those little bits of advice that you've used!

Keep up the good work. Drool ThumpUp

Kev

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roymattblack
#102 Posted : 02 November 2021 09:26:54

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Some seriously good detailing going on here Robin.
I love all the little extra's you're adding.
It makes a world of difference.Love
Plymouth57
#103 Posted : 06 November 2021 21:21:55

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Sincerest thanks to Mark, Chris, Kev and Roy for those kind words, much appreciated as always!Blushing
This installment finishes off the firewall 'bits and pieces' with the fuel valve bracket and addition of the 'dangly bits' on the Oil expansion tank. I've found some new photos of the 312T5 which, although there are a few minor alterations to the engine layout from the T4 does have pretty much the same components with some more clues as to the wiring and pipework. Hopefully they'll come in handy later on!Cool
I'm aching all over at the moment - pretty sure its from having my flu jab on Thursday - I don't normally get anything beyond the sore arm where the needle went in but I think this year's dose is a little more potent due to last year's 'holiday' from seasonal flu!Blink
Anyway!....
So, now for the fuel valve support bracket. It’s a strange looking thing, it only encompasses half of the valve body with no visible means of holding the valve in place. Although, having said that, there is a shot of the valve in one of my reference pics that does appear to (possibly) be a large black cable tie (zip cable?) going around both the circumference of the valve and also around the bracket – I might have to look at that a little closer! Photo 26 shows the start of the bracket with the kit valve together with a short piece of the semi-self-adhesive DecraLed. The round diamond dust rat tail file shown alongside was used to finish off the raised channel seen running along the lead which was started off with a large darning needle. This was impressed into the back face of the strip and is necessary to allow the strip to encompass the valve over its raised rim seen towards the bottom (I’m wondering if this is supposed to represent that cable tie!) The next step was to trim the width of the strip down so it was the same size as the larger cylinder on the valve as shown in Photo 27. Then, using the razor blade cutter the rimmed strip was cut to length starting at the rear locating peg, and coming about one third of the way towards the front of the valve. Once it was cut to size and ‘tacked’ down in place a drop of thin superglue was applied to seal it down. To make the two flanges on the top and bottom of the bracket I went back to the set of leather hole punches I built up making my paper model Sopwith Pups (I used them for cutting out the rotary engine cylinders amongst other larger round parts). Two of these are seen in Photo 28 and were used to cut out a plasticard disk and then punch out the centre of that to fit the valve (that bit is still in the front of the smaller punch). The black arrow points to the DecraLed strip in place around the valve body as mentioned above.
I then had to slice off the part of the disk beyond the rear locating peg, pencil mark the curved end of the disk just beyond the lead strip and cut that back, sanding it down into the curved end shown in Photo 29. I had hoped to be able to make both flanges from the one disk but after rounding off the end of the top right piece of plasticard it was about half a mm too short! A couple of hammer taps later I had made up the second disk and that made up the second flange, both of which are seen superglued in position in Photo 30. Photos 31 and 32 show the painting of the bracket, first a couple of coats of Vallejo Grey Primer followed by a single coat of The Army Painter Warpaints: Rough Iron. Once all was dry I then dry-brushed it with a drop of the grey primer to simulate the wear and tear seen in the reference photo. The final effect, minus its electrical wires, is shown in Photo 33 with the valve firmly pushed into its locating hole in the firewall. The wires will be added in after the engine section has been fixed onto the body of the car, that cut out visible at top right is for one of the two big support struts that join the firewall to the engine block – I’ve already been bitten once with the oil expansion tank’s outlets – I’ll wait and make sure the wires don’t foul the struts (or anything else) first!BigGrin
Now its back to Kev’s Veniard yellow tubing! As I mentioned earlier, I bought a pack of the larger 1mm tubing to try out and as I said then, it turned out to be too small for the fuel lines in this scale. However, with a little help its just right for the expansion tank. Photo 34 shows my first trial outlet made up on the end of a length of the 1mm aluminium tubing. The clear tubing on the end is from another modelling supplier on ebay and is 1.2mm in diameter. This fits extremely well but is too thick and too stiff to form the oil lines. The bottom half of the photo shows the Veniard yellow tubing which is just the right size for the lines and beautifully flexible too. Unfortunately at 1mm diameter it’s also too small to fit the 1mm aluminium!Blink The solution is shown in Photo 35 – gently push the tube end over a suitable needle tip, this one is an old brass ended tool from a dissection kit (no, I can’t remember how on earth I ended up with a dissection kit!) The problem then becomes as soon as the tubing is removed from the needle it immediately returns to its original size. The second solution I discovered is to pour hot water over the tubing whilst it is on the needle and let it cool down again. We have a nifty little water boiler which we use now instead of a kettle, this keeps the water at 85 degrees all day (using a measly 2W of power to do it) and that temperature seems to be ideal for this procedure. As you can see in the lower half of the photo, once cooled down the tube end retains its stretched opening compared to the original end shown below (and this is how it would also look after stretching over the needle and removing without the hot water).
This then allows the tubing to fit over the connectors as shown in Photo 36 (the tube on the bottom is just a short piece used to test the fit). The second tube that I knew where to position is shown in Photo 37, this one passes behind the alternator and drops into a conduit down the left hand side, and finally, Photo 38 shows all the oil lines in position, even though I have no idea where the heck the others go to! (Almost every reference photo shows them going somewhere different, that’s the problem when your references are not only contemporary ‘vintage shots), but also modern photos of ‘re-conditioned’ classic cars. Oh well, there’s bound to be some dark recesses where things go in but never come out!BigGrin
In the next installment, its away from the little details and back to the massive again, with the main forward section incorporating the driver’s cockpit.
Until then, keep safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Firewall pic 5.JPG
Firewall pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#104 Posted : 07 November 2021 12:26:36

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Exceptionally high class work Robin, your attention to detail is forever abundant....Love Love Love ... Love it...Cool Cool

Regards

Alan
Markwarren
#105 Posted : 07 November 2021 17:30:39

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Love what you are going with this kit. Love Love

Mark
bfam4t6
#106 Posted : 08 November 2021 03:49:33

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Loving all the custom details and explanations Robin!
-Dustin

“Details make perfection, and perfection is not a detail.”
-Leonardo Da Vinci

Currently Building:
-Porsche 2.7 RS
-Jaguar E-Type


Currently Collecting
-Ferrari F40
-Ferrari 250 GTO
-Lamborghini Miura
-Ford GT40
-Ecto-1
-Japanese Zero

Kev the Modeller
#107 Posted : 17 November 2021 21:59:31

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Lovely work all round Robin and looking like a seriously detailed engine now - or a large plate of spaghetti!! LOL ThumpUp

Looking forward to your next update already. Cool

Kev

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Plymouth57
#108 Posted : 17 November 2021 22:19:44

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Many thanks indeed to Alan, Mark, Dustin and Kev!Blushing Blushing
I'm in a bit of a waiting game at the moment! I'm in the process of re-painting the big 'aluminium' cockpit piece, I've airbrushed it with the Vallejo Duraluminium which looks great but I want to try and add some depth to the bottom interior by airbrushing one of the darker Vallejo metal colours and I'm waiting for that to arrive.
In the meantime I thought I'd save some time by jumping ahead and completing the suspension and brakes for the other front wheel. I needed to apply the Humbrol Blue Grey enamel wash to the disk brake as before, but when I opened up the bottle the ruddy stuff has turned from a thin wash to a thick jelly! I managed to do the brake with the help of some white spirit but the stuff doesn't dissolve as easily as you'd think (it does when its still liquid though), so anyway, I'm now also waiting for a new bottle of enamel wash (and a black one too) and after finding that the Humbrol youtube videos tell you to dilute it with their enamel thinners, a large bottle of that too!Crying This is the second bottle of wash that's gone like this, still got the first one so I'll find out if that one will dilute back down after all this time as well! I also need the blue grey to detail some of the fuel tank gubbins on the top of the cockpit so I'm waiting on that bit too!Blink
In the meantime I've delved back into some paper modelling as you can see in the Christmas Cutie!BigGrin
See you all when the bits have arrived!

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gibbo
#109 Posted : 18 November 2021 23:37:39

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H Robin
Wow what a prize, Just caught up on your build, another fine piece of innovative scratch building and weathering, just what we've come to expect from you, hope all is well with you and your mum, please send her our regards.
Paul
Building: DelPrado HMS Victory. Building: DeAgostini Sovereign Of The Seas.
Plymouth57
#110 Posted : 01 December 2021 21:03:54

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Many thanks for those kind words Paul, much appreciated and hope you are all doing well up there too!Cool

Apologies for the delay in posting! It’s a combination of necessary DIY (fitting a pair of long awaited double glazed windows to the re-designed porch BEFORE the arrival of Storm Arwen – one upvc front door to go) and an enforced move up from my well beloved windows xp to this damned complicated windows10. Why is it that every new Microsoft OS seems to consist of taking all the easy and useful parts of the preceding windows and replacing them with far more complicated tasks?Blink
I was very relieved when my 24 year old Corel Printhouse installed and seemed to be working on the windows 10 computer but I spoke too soon! The program works ok apart from one (pretty essential) part – it won’t insert jpeg photos from the desktop! For some reason this has been a problem with the Corel ever since I got my Konica Dimage Z10 digital camera. The camera saves its photos as jpegs but even on xp, the Corel wouldn’t accept them into the program when transferred from the micro sd card to the computer. I had to download the photo and then double click the image and select ‘copy to’ to save it back to the desktop, I’d then get the ‘already exists, do you want to replace?’ message and once the image was replaced it would open perfectly fine in the Corel – even though both files were jpegs with the same name to begin with!Confused Weird but manageable. Unfortunately the copy to function in windows 10 doesn’t fix the problem at all. It looks like I might have to carry on using the xp computer to put the diaries together and then transfer the diary text and the pre-saved photo page(s) via flash drive to the new computer to up-load them to Modelspace. If you are reading this it must have worked!BigGrin
Anyhow, on to the big stuff (excepting those big heavy windows of course)!
Photo 1 shows the BIG part I’m working on now, this is the main aluminium body section called the ‘Cockpit Cradle’ in the instructions. After the oil expansion tank and the fuel valve this thing is enormous – ten inches long, three inches high and three inches wide (25x7.5x7.5cm (ish)). This shot also includes a part from a couple of phases further down the schedule, namely the rear of the driver’s section. The rear of this part is seen in Photo 2 and I decided to put it in early as I’m going to be airbrushing the entire cradle with Vallejo Metal Colour so it will be far easier and more economical to do it all in one go. This piece, the ‘Driver’s Backplate’ comes in Phase 25 along with the seat belts.
Put together both of these components by fitting the openings on the plate on to the columns on the cradle (circled in the photograph) and inserting the end of the plate into the cradle (arrowed in the photograph).
That’s what the instructions say about fitting the backplate into the cradle. Sounds easy but not quite so easy in practice! I struggled for quite some time trying to get the thing to slide in. It went in eventually but with the help of considerable force and once in, it wasn’t going anywhere, especially back out again!BigGrin To be honest it didn’t really need any screws to keep it in but I put in the pair of Type J screws anyway, one of which is shown in Photo 3. One of the changes I’ll be making is to alter the appearance of the fuel tank filler cap. As shown in Photo 4, this is supplied as a black ‘infill’ on the kit part whereas on the actual vehicle it appears as shown in Photo 5 – a natural metal finish in slightly different shades (steel?). I’ll be airbrushing the entire body or cradle in Vallejo Duraluminium with a darker mix of that colour with some Vallejo Jet Exhaust added to try and accentuate the shadows in the floor and sides of the driver’s section. The fuel tank filler will be washed with various strengths of the Humbrol Blue Grey enamel wash (new bottle has arrived) with the strut brackets given the same treatment.
Well, that’s the plan anyway! In the next installment we’ll find out how the ‘shadowing’ has gone and start on that fuel tank filler.
Until then, stay safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Cockpit Section pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#111 Posted : 12 December 2021 21:08:46

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I think I'm slowly getting there regarding this (expletive deleted) Windows10 stuff! I managed to get the new computer to get online ok but for some reason the ruddy thing would keep dropping out of the wifi connection to the router!Cursing
Having looked online for possible causes I decided that the easiest way to solve a wifi problem was to do away with the wifi connection!Cool And having learned very recently that the four ethernet sockets on the router are actually designed to have four devices running simultaneously and not, as I thought simply different channels to try and get a good connection for one deviceBlushing Blushing Blushing
I sent off for another ethernet cable and bingo! No more unexpected loss of connection! (Touch wood!)Blink
Ok then, onwards...
Well, I’m glad to say the airbrushing went really well. The first job after airbrushing the whole piece in Vallejo Duraluminium was to mask off the upper panels on each side of the cockpit to keep the shadowing to the lower panels. The masking is shown in Photo 6, using Frog Tape which was cut out following a pattern I first made up in thin card. I first stuck the tape down on the worktop cutting boards a few times to reduce the tackiness of the tape so it didn’t pull off any of the previously dried Duraluminium. I then airbrushed a mixture of Duraluminium and Vallejo Jet Exhaust Metal Colour at 3:1 to give a subtle shading effect. It was definitely subtle, so subtle in fact I could hardly see any difference! I then tried a mix of 1:1 which still wasn’t dark enough and ended up airbrushing light coats of Jet Exhaust on its own which gave a nice shadowing effect as seen in Photos 7 to 9 which can be compared to the original kit finish, repeated in Photo 10. The real pity is that just like the lovely pipe-work on the engine, most of the shadowing is completely hidden by the driver’s seat panel a little way down the line!Crying
Just for those who can’t resist sneak previews, Photo 11 shows how the engine and its firewall fits into the rear of the cockpit cradle!
With the overall colour on, I then had to re-detail the fuel tank filler, which was previously an overall matt black. This was achieved with Humbrol Blue Grey Enamel Wash, applied thinned down to fill in the flat bottom section and the surrounding riveted ring, and with a darker solution of the wash applied to the two crescent plates front and back, shown in Photo 12 and enlarged in Photo 13. The same darker wash was also applied to the riveted brackets, which carry the roll bar later on and also, the two struts which help to secure the engine to the chassis. The grooves around the filler and the rivets were then accentuated with Humbrol Black Enamel Wash. The brackets which form the top of the driver’s position are shown in Photo 14 after the blue grey and black treatment. I also tried to pick out the edges of the thin brackets which are found on either side of the top of the cradle in the black wash but it was so thin it took multiple applications to get any noticeable effect! It was much easier picking out the panel lines on my Spitfires with this wash in the ‘Scramble!’ diorama but I suddenly remembered afterwards that I airbrushed the Spitfires with that Johnson’s Klear before applying the wash, maybe I should have done that here too! (I’d forgotten all about it, plus I’d already airbrushed the Vallejo Metal Colour clear varnish over the whole thing).
Anyway, I’m quite pleased with the overall effect and with the cockpit cradle, that brings us to the end of Pack 3. The next step is to begin the seat belt construction, which should have gone on to the rear of the driver’s compartment before it was added on to the cradle (but couldn’t because of the re-painting). After that, Pack 4 is devoted entirely to the construction of the cockpit.
Until then Happy Modelling to you All and stay safe!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Cockpit Section pic 2.JPG
Cockpit Section pic 3.JPG
Cockpit Section pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gibbo
#112 Posted : 12 December 2021 21:57:22

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Great detail work as always Robin
Regards
Paul
Building: DelPrado HMS Victory. Building: DeAgostini Sovereign Of The Seas.
roymattblack
#113 Posted : 13 December 2021 19:21:35

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This just keeps getting better and better.
Astounding work. Keep it coming.Love
Plymouth57
#114 Posted : 26 December 2021 21:59:34

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Many thanks for those kind words Paul and Roy, really appreciated!Blushing

Pack 25 contains the parts for the driver’s seat belt. There are three parts of actual ‘belt’ although the longest piece comes up through two slots in the driver’s chair section later on, effectively making two belts out of one. The remaining bits are a couple of self-adhesive sponsor decals and a two part connector similar to what the fighter pilots had on their seat harness straps during WW2. The belts themselves are made of a blue fabric, stitched on to a plastic bracket at the top, a plastic buckle in the middle and a metal clip at the bottom (Photo 1).
Photo 2 shows those brackets and clip and also some ‘excess’ stitching thread, which needs to be carefully trimmed back before proceeding on. I used my micro scissors to do the trimming, the blades shown in Photo 3 are about 15mm long with the snipped off threads and ‘fuzz’ shown alongside. The two brackets are push fitted into a pair of recessed rectangles with two locating holes each on the rear bulkhead of the cockpit. In Photo 4 the brackets are shown lightly pressed in (very lightly, the thing you learn on this kit is the hardest part is actually getting the bits apart again after ‘test fitting’!)BigGrin
One thing I did notice early on was that both the brackets have some nasty looking mould and injection marks on the sides. A bit too noticeable as you can see in Photo 5. At first I decided to file and sand the marks down as shown in Photo 6, but after trying to work around the moulded on bolts I suddenly thought why bother? I’d already cast a variety of resin nuts and bolts for the battery clamps so I filed the kit ones off completely and replaced them with my smallest castings seen in Photo 7 (that’s a 1cm square they’re sat in). Once they were super glued on as in Photo 8, I carefully sanded off the thread on the inner side of each bracket, leaving just the nut. On the real item there is obviously a nut and bolt, with a fixed head on one end and the nut on the other, I thought it would be logical for their maintenance to have the moving nut on the ‘outboard’ side where it would be easier to get at! (And that’s the full extent of my Formula 1 mechanics course!)Blushing The next task was to mask over the fabric belt so that I could re-paint the brackets, this was easier than I’d expected, the strip of masking tape just slid under the bracket and belt and then wrapped around and stuck to the belt as seen in Photo 9. I first gave the brackets a couple coats of Vallejo Grey Primer, shown in Photo 10, followed by a couple of coats of Vallejo Model Air Chrome, applied by brush with some Humbrol Black Enamel Wash after the acrylic was dry as seen in Photo 11. Next came the sponsor’s decals, these were carefully removed with fine tweezers from the backing sheet and positioned on the belts before pressing down firmly. They stuck really well as shown in Photo 12 but I’m not too sure about the high gloss finish. If I can find some photos of the belts in use I might try some semi or dead matt varnish later on. I did consider painting the buckles in chrome as well as they have appeared this way on other scale models of the 312, but the one photo I found of old Giles in his seat did seem to show them as very dark, probably even black!
Photo 13 shows the two belts with their brackets pushed firmly into the rear bulkhead. Eventually, most of the details will be (again) unfortunately hidden as the driver’s seat is placed into the cockpit. The final Photo 14 illustrates this with the seat just resting on its locator pegs, there is enough of the brackets showing to make the extra work worth while though!Cool
The next step is the anti-roll bar frame with the two side panels. As this will require more airbrushing, that’s a job for after the Christmas rush!Blink
Until then Merry Christmas to you All and Happy Modelling!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Seat Belts pic 1.JPG
Seat Belts pic 2.JPG
Seat Belts pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gibbo
#115 Posted : 29 December 2021 04:33:28

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Nicely done Robin
WW2 fighter Pilot, 17+ shillings a week (ave), life expectancy 4 weeks
F1 driver today £480,000 a week (ave), Life expectancy 3% per year.

Building: DelPrado HMS Victory. Building: DeAgostini Sovereign Of The Seas.
roymattblack
#116 Posted : 29 December 2021 16:15:27

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Another great update.
Keep it coming...Love
Plymouth57
#117 Posted : 08 January 2022 18:48:30

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Location: Plympton
Many thanks again to Paul and Roy! £480,000 per week? That's less than some professional footballers get and all they seem to do is run around for 90 minutes and pretend to get injured!!BigGrin BigGrin Cursing

Anyway, the first job for the New Year is to assemble the anti-roll bar frame with it’s two side panels. The parts for this come in Pack 26 as shown in Photo 1. We have the anti-roll bar which comes as a chrome plated metal casting, a pair of triangular plastic panels which either just clip into place or can be glued if the join is too loose (mine were nice and tight) together with a pack of five Type G screws to secure the frame to the cockpit ‘fuselage’ (again, only four required with a helpful spare)!Cool
As you can see in the photo, the manufacturers have helpfully (NOT) already applied the emergency sign decals to the left hand panel. This is a slight problem of course as I’m re-spraying the larger silvered/chromed components with the Vallejo Metal Colours to match everything up. There are two obvious routes to follow here – either mask off the decals and airbrush the Duraluminium then (hopefully) reveal the decals back again or else create my own DIY replacements. The problem with the masking is, by the time I’ve airbrushed the panels in Vallejo black primer and then a coat of Duraluminium or possibly two, when the masking is removed the decals will be a few paint coats lower than the new top surface! Fortunately, the panel is a flat component and so I took it, placed it into the scanner of my new shiny Epson Eco Tank printer and scanned it. Photo 2 shows the screen of my old faithful Windows XP computer which I’m still using to create the diaries on before flash driving them over to the new Windows 10 machine to up-load. In the picture, the top scan of the panel is life size, the bottom one is a duplicate enlarged just to show you here. The page they are on is actually the older page of Corel Print House I made up the battery face decal design on (I later re-named the page and deleted the battery designs so I could print off just the emergency stickers without wasting the decal paper).
Using the life sized scan I then duplicated it, sent the duplicate to Corel Photo House (which is a part of Print House) and then cropped the photo down to just the red circle with the ‘E’. That was then edited with colour-fill to improve the quality of the red and blue before again colour-filling to turn the previously silver background white. This, after more duplicating, gave me the four red circles shown above in Photo 3. I did the same with the blue triangle with the lightning symbol but then realized that cutting out the finished decals would be easier if I turned the background into the same red as the outline around the triangle. So as you can see in the top right I have a series of blue triangles on a common red background. I did later redo the red circle decals, using the shape creator and text to create a red circle the same size as the scanned one with a blue capital ‘E’ inserted on top (I had to also insert tiny red rectangles to cover up part of the middle line on the E as the text I had used had all three lines the same length!)Blink
Once I deleted the battery decals, I moved the two new designs up to the top of the page, duplicating them to form a full line which was then printed off onto white decal paper as shown at the bottom of the photo.
Back to the metal anti-roll bar frame, Photo 4 shows the before and after shots. On the left is the piece as it comes in the kit, on the right is the same part after some toning down with the Humbrol Blue Grey Enamel Wash. This actually took some time to get just right, probably because the attic workroom is, shall we say ‘a little cooler’ than it was a few months ago, the enamel wash was quite thick and needed multiple brushings with thinners to get it to the right shade or tone.
Photo 5 illustrates the ‘accentuated shadowing’ of the side panels. The exterior face is airbrushed with the Metal Colour Duraluminium whilst the interior is airbrushed with the Metal Colour Jet Exhaust. This was where I discovered a very interesting fact – after first getting a very thin, watery effect with the Duraluminium which I immediately washed off under the cold tap I discovered that the ideal ratio of paint to thinner for the Vallejo Metal Colour range is – 1:0! The paint sprays best used straight from the bottle. I just drip about fifteen drops straight into the airbrush cup and spray away. If any is left over just take the bottle cap off and drip it back in!BigGrin
As I mentioned earlier, the fit of the side panels into the metal frame bars was a nice positive ‘click in’ so I didn’t need any glue and Photo 6 shows the two panels securely on the frame. There are four locating pegs on each panel, three going up the top sloping frame and one in the bottom corner. Once they are all lined up a little pressure on the panel and in they went. The thing that really impressed me on this section was the fit of the bottom edge of each panel to the top of the fuel tank beneath. If you remember back when I was re-spraying the cockpit body, I was trying to get the flanges running along the length of the fuel tank to stand out with some subtle shadowing. One of those flanges is shown in Photo 7. Photo 8 shows the frame fitted into the four holes in the tank top and after the four Type G screws have been secured into the bottom of the frame from below. Only now did it become obvious that those two flanges are not actually a part of the tank but are the bottom of the side panels, bent through a right angle and riveted to the tank! Photo 9 illustrates just how well that joint works. The DIY decals were given two coats of Humbrol Semi Gloss Clear Enamel varnish, (the first attempt used only one coat to keep the decals as thin as possible – when released from the backing paper they immediately curled up into a cylinder!) Two coats was fine (or at least better- I still had to move quickly to get them off the backing and onto the model) and I cut out the triangular decal with scissors having found even a new knife blade still produced a torn edge to the red border on close inspection (obviously the decals weren’t that thick even with two coats!) The circular decal was a little harder however and for that I used an 8mm steel leather punch, one of the ever growing set I bought whilst working on the card Sopwith Pup (for making the engine sections). The strip of decals was placed on the cutting mat, the end of the punch carefully placed in position followed by a couple of taps with a medium sized hammer to neatly cut out the circle. The decals were soaked in Humbrol Decal Fix for a couple of minutes or so, it’s quicker in the summer warmth though! Then they were placed into position on the left hand panel, using the slightly raised impressions from the original decals visible under the re-sprayed metal finish to get them exactly right as shown in Photo 10. You can just make out those impressions in Photo 8. And finally, Photo 11 illustrates that emphasized shadow effect I was trying to get from using the Jet Exhaust colour on the interior faces of the panels.
In the next instalment, the big gaping hole in the left hand panel gets plugged with the addition of the battery electrical system emergency kill switch (more scratch building to come of course!)
Until then, Happy New Year to you All and Happy Modelling too!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Anti Roll Bar pic 1.JPG
Anti Roll Bar pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gibbo
#118 Posted : 09 January 2022 03:10:59

Rank: Vice-Master

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Some great stuff going on again Robin, and happy new year to yourself and mum.
Building: DelPrado HMS Victory. Building: DeAgostini Sovereign Of The Seas.
Markwarren
#119 Posted : 09 January 2022 10:11:43

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Just catching up Robin, very impressive work.Love Love Drool I also have this kit and I’m making notes.BigGrin

Mark
roymattblack
#120 Posted : 09 January 2022 11:30:14

Rank: Super-Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Another great update from you Robin. This build is epic!Love
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