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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
roymattblack
#161 Posted : 29 May 2022 14:24:47

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Yet another great update.
Really enjoying this one.
Markwarren
#162 Posted : 29 May 2022 16:56:08

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Very nicely done Robin, it really is making a big difference to the stock parts.Love Love Drool

Mark
Plymouth57
#163 Posted : 02 June 2022 20:30:50

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Many thanks again to Roy and both the Marks!BigGrin
In this instalment we begin the first stage of re-engineering the brake cylinders into something closer to what the reference photos show....
The details on which the brake cylinder re-build is based on come from two photos (with a third later on), which are shown in Photo 6, and Photo 8. Photo 6 shows the brake fluid tanks actually fitted with the same green tubing as used in the kit, but if you look closely at the blown up section in Photo 7, the arrow is pointing to a light coloured connector which indicates that as mentioned earlier, the right hand tank is split between the master cylinder and the right hand outer cylinder. The set up I’m actually going for is shown in Photo 8 with much thicker blue tubing. The main reason for this is a) I haven’t got any green tubing to match the kit part and b) I can actually see where the things are going to in this picture!BigGrin
As you can see in the second blow up shown in Photo 9, the left hand tank is connected to the rear of the left hand cylinder by the blue tube which then feeds into a copper pipe (like conventional water plumbing) which is routed up to a three way bronze coloured connector. From there, two horizontal copper pipes pass out around the corners of the chassis into an ‘L’ shaped connector which joins onto that white braided cable supplied with the kit. As you’ll see later, what I first thought was a black coloured nut in the middle of this connector is actually a black metal ‘D’ shaped tab welded onto the wheel strut with the connector securely bolted into it. The left tank therefore supplies both front brakes!
On the other side, the right hand tank has a shorter blue hose which is split into two and connects to the two rear connections on both the master cylinder and the right hand one. The front connections have two thinner tubes coming out of them, white on the master cylinder and brown on the right hand. These pass through a hole in the front of the chassis and into the cut out in the triangular box on the chassis wall seen just above the nose cone fixing point in Photo 8.
So, a lot of work to consider, starting with the re-working of the two outer cylinders shown in Photo 10. This should have been a ‘before and after’ shot – but I accidentally glued the first resin nut onto the before cylinder instead of the after!Blushing Basically, the front moulded spigot is cut off and the little raised bump is drilled out to accept a 1mm copper micro tube. The nut is one of the middle sized resin castings with the thread sanded off and also drilled out to slide over the spigot. Photo 11 shows the two cylinders after airbrushing with Vallejo Black Primer followed by Metal Colour Semi Matt Aluminium (on the left) and finished off with Vallejo Blue-Green on the nut, dry-brushed blue-green and white for the highlights and given the Humbrol Black Enamel Wash (on the right). The first cylinder was then super glued onto the gold chassis front plate as shown in Photo 12.
Then for the tubing! As I mentioned, I didn’t have any of that translucent green that came with the kit, but I did find a perfect source for the thicker blue version – mains cable insulation! This is the neutral wire of course and the progression from mains cable to Ferrari brake fluid pipe is shown in Photo 13, from top to bottom: piece of stripped insulation, groove filed into the rubber at one end for the jubilee clip to fit into, jubilee clip fashioned from thin aluminium sheet, embossed with a pounce wheel, tubing with Jubilee clip fitted (before I realised my mistake putting the screw thingy on the wrong way!Blushing Blushing ) At this point I was a little wary of how much force the thick tubing would be putting on the thin plastic spigots on the fluid tanks and the cylinders after it was bent around. Fortunately I discovered this could be neutralised by inserting a thin wire into the insulation, shorter than the tube to allow the two spigots to go in. The pre-bent pipe is shown in Photo 14 along with the thin wire (and the corrected jubilee screw!Cool ) The first pipe is shown glued in place in Photo 15, the master cylinder and right hand cylinder have also been super glued in place at this point, the master in the centre has been drilled out and fitted with a styrene rod base and nut with an aluminium tube for a spigot. For those thinking of adding this detail to their kits, wait until the end of this section as I came up with a far better method of fitting the split tube (after it was too late to change mine!Crying ) It was whilst drilling through the cylinders that I realised that they were actually moulded hollow inside! Note the hole in the chassis between the two tanks, this is for the copper pipe connector which is coming later.
The next task was to form the three-way connector to join the two pipes going to the cylinders to the single pipe coming from the tank. This is shown in Photo 16 and is simply composed of two pieces of 1mm diameter brass rod. The end of one piece is bent around a 1mm metal former to create a loop or ring which is then tightened around the second piece with pliers and soldered together. The soldered joint was then filed down to form a more ‘boxy’ looking thing as shown here. Photo 17 shows the two blue pipes attached temporarily before they were removed and attached to the cylinders as seen in Photo 18. The arms of the brass ‘T’ joint were then snipped back and the two pipes joined together as in Photo 19. Throughout all the pipe measuring I was using the brown insulation from the same cable, pushing it on to one of the spigots, bending it to where it had to go and marking the length, then cutting it to size and checking the fit. Once it was just right I then used the brown bit to cut the blue to length.
The final part of this section was to fit in the last blue pipe from the tank to the three way joint. This was ‘ahem’ fiddly, but got there in the end!Blink
Now, as I said earlier, for those who might want to add their own such details, I worked out an easier method after I’d done all this! As you’ve seen, I left the rear spigot on the right hand cylinder and added one to the central master cylinder – what I should have done is this. Remove the rear spigot from the right cylinder and drill it out just like the front ones. Drill out the central cylinder and add on the raised tubular base and the turquoise nut (also add the nut on the right hand cylinder too). Then, when making the brass rod ‘T’ joint, make the two side arms longer than I did, place the T between the two cylinders and carefully bend the arms down to match the holes. Once the brass rods fit, cut them to size allowing for the bit that will be glued inside the hollow cylinders. When that’s done you can then cut the blue tubing to size and slide it up the bent brass arms and simply drop the ends down through the nuts and super glue into position. This will allow you to get the ‘U’ shape much lower down than I got mine as I was stopped by the height of the spigots (especially the new one I fitted on the master cylinder which could have been much shorter)! Anyhow, I’m pretty pleased with the overall look of the new ‘plumbing’, just hope the system is pressurised and not gravity fed otherwise I’ve got no rear brakes! (But then we never had any anyway!Flapper )
In the follow up instalment, it’s time to move to the front of the cylinders and a whole lot more plumbing to add in!
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Brake Cylinders pic 2.JPG
Brake Cylinders pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#164 Posted : 13 June 2022 20:43:30

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The first task needed to continue the pipe work to the cylinders was to knock out some connecting nuts and a three way junction for the copper tubing to the front brakes (shown arrowed in Photo 20). There were a pair of brass compression nuts for the left hand and master cylinders and a different rounded connector for the right hand cylinder. I did try to create the compression nuts from a length of hex styrene rod by securing a short length in my Mantua mini wood lathe and filing down the rounded top as the lathe spun around. I did get some pretty good looking nuts, but the effort required and the difficulties in getting a consistent finish convinced me to look for an easier solution. That solution came by way of a supplier of sub-miniature nuts and bolts on Ebay as shown in Photo 21. These are ‘Acorn nuts’ machined in solid brass and are even threaded on the inside. They were my second attempt, the first being a set of ten M1 nuts. As the copper tubing was 1mm I assumed the nuts would be just right – they were TINY!Blushing As you can see in Photo 22 they are miniscule up against the new set, which are M2.5 (and they are not cheap!) As I would be needing quite a few of these nuts overall I decided it would be easier (and far cheaper) to cast them in resin which would be much easier to drill out as well. The nuts are shown temporarily glued to a Lego base plate with Deluxe Card Glue, once set, I built a Lego brick wall around them and simply poured in some mould rubber to create a simple casting mould. The process of creating the nuts is shown in Photo 23. After mixing a small amount of resin I used the mixing stick to drop some resin into each nut mould on the little block of rubber. Then each one was prodded with a cocktail stick to remove any air bubbles and allowed to cure. Once solid we have a selection of acorn nuts, each on its own little round base. The top of the rounded acorn was then gently sanded flat before a 1mm drill bit was hand drilled down through nut and base. Finally the hollowed nut was pressed up against the side of a cutting mat and with the mat holding it steady, a safety razor cutter was held flat against the base of the nut and slid forward slicing the nut clean off as seen on the right. Gripping the nut in a pair of tweezers it was then gently rubbed over fine sandpaper to clean up the bottom ready for priming.
With those underway, I could then think about the copper pipe connector, which was bolted to the front chassis plate between the two fluid tanks. Photos 24 and 25 show the first version of the design. Two pieces of styrene rod were joined into a ‘T’ (one being filed with a round diamond dust file on the end until it fitted snugly to the other). A larger diameter rod was then also filed the same to fit on the top of the ‘T’ with a sanded down resin cast nut super glued on the front. The three arms were then drilled out to accept a solid smaller rod (this one was about forty plus years old) which then had a drilled out steel nut from the spectacle repair nut and bolt set glued onto the ends as shown in Photo 25. The rear of the top section was also drilled out from the back and a bolt super glued into place (why you’ll see later!)
My initial intension was to cast the whole thing in resin, unfortunately I hit an unplanned snag! When cast, I then had to drill out the moulded nuts to push in the 1mm copper micro tubing. What I hadn’t allowed for was that the forty year old styrene rods behind those nuts were about 1mm diameter themselves so when the nuts were drilled through the section behind was so thin they would break off with the slightest pressure (a real ‘Doh’ moment!) As shown in Photo 26, the Mark 2 version did away with both the resin nut and the thinner section behind, I simply drilled right through with a 1mm bit and now the copper tube itself provides the thinner piece with a drilled out steel nut replacing the resin one. Remember that bolt glued to the original? That was so I could push a bolt of the same size into the rubber mould before adding the resin resulting in a ‘cast in’ metal fixing point to secure the connector to the plastic chassis frontCool . The plastic plate was drilled and the connector literally screwed into place (a very tight fit it was too!)
The next job was to bend the micro tube into the complicated shape necessary to a) attach the bottom nut to the connector, b) curve back up from the bottom of the connector, passing over the gold frame and down into the cylinder via the resin nut. After an entire evening spent trying to persuade a one inch piece of copper tube to do all that I decided there must be an easier way (actually it was more like ‘Cursing to Hell with this, there MUST be an easier way!Cursing ’) And there was! Back to the craft and hobbies section on Ebay and I found a coil of copper plated aluminium wire – looks just like the micro tube but is much easier to bend into shape. I think it was about a ten metre roll for just a couple of pounds or so. This is shown fitted into the bottom of the connector in Photo 27 and down through the resin nut and into the drilled out cylinder in Photo 28. Note, I went over the copper plated wire with a thinned down Vallejo acrylic Copper just to tone down the ‘bright and shiny new pipe look’. The two other copper pipes, which come in from the sides, have to wait until the front wheel struts are in place as their fixing points are part of the struts, (or will be once I've added them on).
Now for the right hand front cylinder connection. That one was different to the other two in that it doesn’t have an acorn brass nut on the end. Instead there is a strange looking brass connector that looks more like a heavy duty electrical terminal than a hydraulic equivalent! I forgot to put in the photos of the parts going together but as you can see in the following photos it was made from two diameters of styrene rod, liquid poly glued together with the fat short piece drilled out for a 1mm brass rod to glue into the cylinder with a thinned down resin bolt head glued over the top and the longer thinner part drilled to take the 0.5mm wire painted brown to match the ref photos. Before adding this on however it was first necessary to drill out a fairly big hole into the triangular box as shown in Photo 29. The insert pic shows the actual part on the real thing. It should really be a ‘D’ shaped cut out rather than a round hole which I could have done earlier before gluing on the box – if I’d known then I was adding all this stuff on!Blink Using a drop of super glue, the end of the brown painted wire was glued into the drilled out hole after first threading it through the hole in the chassis front as seen in Photo 30. The hole was drilled large enough to glue in a short bit of the rubber sheathing to act as the rubber ‘anti-rub’ grommit. A small resin nut was then drilled out for the wire to pass through, painted brass and threaded on to the wire as in Photo 31. Finally, the wire was shaped into position to reach the cylinder through the brass connector and the excess snipped off before gluing the end into the connector and sliding the nut up to finish it off (Photo 32).
In the following instalment the white tube in the middle is added in and work begins on something else (I have no idea what it is), but it seems to be connected (literally) with the rear brakes (somehow)!Confused
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!


Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Brake Cylinders pic 4.JPG
Brake Cylinders pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#165 Posted : 17 June 2022 12:35:47

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Great update Robin, very nicely done. I see in this update you've gone nutsFlapper

Mark
Plymouth57
#166 Posted : 27 June 2022 20:34:36

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Many thanks again Mark and you're closer to the truth than you realise!Blink
This instalment should have been posted some days ago but I had to completely re-do it as I made a major boo-boo as you'll see below and had to pull everything off and start again!Blushing

However, before all that happened...
Before carrying on with the next part of the brake system it was necessary to jump ahead of the official build schedule and screw the top and bottom sections of the chassis together. The reason being that many of the extra parts going on lead from one section to the other so it made sense to join them up to avoid any unfortunate ‘coming aparts’!BigGrin
Photos 33 and 34 illustrate the positions of the four fixing screws – two at the rear, which are hidden by the firewall when that goes on, and two in the floor to be hidden by the seat later on.
Photo 35 shows the centre cylinder with the white tube or cable in position. As this follows a much more curving route than the brown one fitted last time, I made the white one out of a length of thin solder painted white. It passes from the centre cylinder under the blue hoses and up through the same hole as the brown to finish in the same cut out on the chassis side. The extra mechanism to be added for the rear brakes is shown in Photo 36. It begins with a metal rod attached to an offset cam on (the driver’s) right shown by the left hand arrow (or so I thought)Crying and then goes into a black rubber tube indicated by the right hand arrow. The tube then passes through the front chassis panel above the brown and white tubing where (from what I can tell) it passes back through the cockpit on the driver’s left, along the side of the body and back to the left rear brake where a steel cable exits the tube and is attached to a triangular plate on the brake mechanism. How it gets to the other rear brake I have yet to discover!Blink The cable will come much later when the rest of the engine/gearbox comes together but the front mechanism will be going on now. Photo 37 shows what I thought I was looking at! The red outline covers the brass end of the brake mechanism and what I took for a cam coming off the gold coloured bracket cylinder. So off I went happily making up the mechanism shown in Photo 38. Aluminium micro-tubing to make the metal slide thing and the ring attachment on the end with styrene tubing and sheet with a tiny length of micro copper tube to make the cam which then fitted into a larger styrene tube glued to the front of the metal cast bracket. After much hard work I ended up with the completed system as seen in Photo 39. It really looked the part too! So on I went with the next stage, adding the wheel struts so I could then add the final part of the brake line connectors, (which is why they are actually in place in Photo 42!) It was only when I was putting the photo pages together and bringing the build diary up to date ready to post the next instalment that I suddenly realised why the same area looked different from the back angle – I’d completely miss read the reference photo – as shown in Photos 40 and 41, there wasn’t any cam on the gold bracket, the sliding thing was actually bolted to the black rocking arm piece which is attached to the shock absorber! You’ve got to laugh haven’t you! (hint: NO!)Crying Crying Crying Ah well, off it had to come. Fortunately the reconstruction wasn’t as difficult as I’d feared, the actual mechanism was fine, it just required a longer black rubber tube to allow the attachment ring to reach the new location which first needed to be drilled to take a brass ship building pin to form the new ‘bolt’. Photo 42 shows the plastic anti roll arm having been drilled and fitted with the brass pin. Behind it is the tube extension on the bracket which would have to be removed as well and a new front section fitted over the ground down ‘stud’ that was there before. The existing mechanism is shown being passed down the brass pin in Photo 43, once glued in position up against the rocker arm the excess pin shaft was snipped off leaving just a mm or so proud of the ring. A slightly bigger resin nut was then prepared, before priming and painting with Vallejo Brass it was drilled out on the reverse to allow it to fit over the protruding brass pin and then super glued in place as shown in Photo 44. The composite Photo 45 shows the new attachment from the rear together with the darned ref photo that caused all the bother! Now they finally match up!BigGrin In order to fit the flexible rubber hose to the chassis front plate I took a small piece of aluminium micro tube (same one as made the larger sections of the mechanism itself) and epoxy steel glued it to the chassis as shown in Photo 46. After leaving it overnight to set fully the end of the hose was simply push fitted into position. I had also super glued it onto the aluminium spigot first time around which meant some careful scalpel work to get it off again!Blushing Once in place (unglued this time) I then cut a small section of the rubber tube to glue on the inside of the chassis front as shown in Photo 47. They are not connected at all but give an optical illusion of passing through the plate. When the chassis is complete I’ll glue the long cable, probably of black electrical wire into the short rubber piece and lead it back the side of the chassis to the rear brake. It’ll be in the way if I do that now. Finally, in Photo 48 we have the re-located mechanism, now in the right place! The only piece I needed to replace was the rubber hose with a longer section, which wasn’t too bad at all. It actually took far longer to re-write and re-photo the diary than it did to change the model! DOUBLE CHECK YOUR REFERENCE PICS!!!
In the next instalment its time to put on the wheel struts to fit the brake line connectors on to.
Until then (further ‘errors’ permitting), Happy Modelling to you All!Blushing Blushing

Robin.

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Brake Cylinders pic 6.JPG
Brake Cylinders pic 8.JPG
Brake Cylinders pic 9.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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