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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
Markwarren
#301 Posted : 20 September 2023 10:26:32

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Fabulous job Robin, it been a Labour of love just watching you.Love Love

Mark
Plymouth57
#302 Posted : 27 November 2023 23:18:12

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Sincerest thanks for those kind words Mark, it's definitely been a labour but a highly enjoyable one!BigGrin
Many apologies for the lengthy delay since the last posting – have had some medical problems with both myself and my 95 year old Mum. Mum’s are thankfully gone now, mine are ‘improving’ (slowly since I’ve just joined the ranks of the OAPs – hey, FREE BUS PASS! Yahoo!)Cool BigGrin Flapper
Anyway, I’ve now discovered how to get up to the attic and back down again one handed so here we are again!Blink
The actual construction of the nameplate for the eventual display base was done before my ‘ahem’ accident but its taken until now to get the resultant trial castings painted up to where I could take photos for the diary and post them up.
As seen in Photo 1, the basis for the nameplate was the original base plaques for the scratch build Chindit bust from a few years ago. As intended at the time, the Chindit’s nameplate had the 3d plastic letters fixed down with Deluxe Card Glue so I would be able to dismantle them again for the next project. The bigger nameplate at the top has been soaked in fairly hot clean water until the glue softened and the letters could be pulled off the plasticard. The smaller sign in the middle is awaiting that task and the new Ferrari 312T4 sign under way at the bottom is composed of some recovered letters and some newly removed from the sprue they came on (once I'd found the sprue of course). If I remember correctly the company that makes the letters is called Carrs – they are actually designed for making railway station names in various scales for model railways but they are perfect for making three dimensional name plates too!
Photo 2 shows the new sign with the tiny letters now recovered forming the second line of the Ferrari info. Note that the ‘NO’, short for number of course, later had the ‘o’ replaced with an even smaller slice of round styrene rod with its centre drilled out to form a better looking version. In Photo 3 the 3d lettering is completed, the main technical info will be from a DIY decal made later. The nameplate is now being fitted out with a styrene square rod frame which surrounds the entire plate and also divides the text area from the Ferrari logo and a photo of the great man Giles himself. The logo badge I’d already obtained from the internet back at the beginning of the build to replace the one on the front wing, the photo of Giles was similarly found after much more trawling through the net!
Photos 4 and 5 show the process of turning the original into a silicone mould for casting the plate in resin. In 4 the plate has been temporarily fixed to the melamine base with a couple of drops of card glue and the usual mould box constructed around it with good old Lego bricks, in 5 we have the rubber mould below and the recovered original above – the tiny things scattered around the lower section are the few letters that came off the base when it was removed from the rubber!Blushing
The first casting I tried was using what resin I had left from the Sword Beach project, this was probably a year old by the time I was using it on those castings and its now gone way past its use by date! Although it will still mix and cure, the finish is becoming a little ‘variable’ with some areas coming out more shiny than others and I think, more prone to air bubbles too. I sent off for a fresh supply from my usual online supplier and the result is shown in Photo 6. The old resin is shown at the bottom and you might just make out the uneven finish, the new, fresh resin is shown above and is a much more uniform consistency. The first casting wasn’t wasted however; it is shown again at the top after a coat of black car primer and a polishing over with the Uschi Chrome finish powder. The logo and data section are simply plain paper printings from the developing decal sheet graphics placed on the casting – just to experiment!
Photo 7 shows the photo I found of Giles on the internet, this will be cropped down to just his head and shoulders for the rectangular box on the right of the plate. The next trial was to use the ‘good’ casting with a coat of Vallejo Grey primer airbrushed on followed by a second coat of a car spray Chrome as seen in Photo 8. To help the letters stand out more they were then given a MiG Blue-Black enamel wash applied around each letter by very small, fine paintbrush. Photo 9 illustrates half of the Ferrari 312T4 and most of the smaller second line after the wash was applied.
The full trial is shown in Photos 10 to 1410 is the first defective casting with the Chrome finish powder polished on, the logo, portrait and data section are all ink jet printed on to self adhesive sticker paper. Photo 11 had the casting first primed and then sprayed with a commercial gold aerosol before adding the same blue-black ink wash to the raised lettering and the same sticker paper artwork. Photo 12 is the chrome sprayed example seen earlier but with the first of the inkjet DIY waterslide decals as opposed to the stickers, these are a little darker than the sticker paper ones. Photo 13 is a return to the same gold sprayed one but with the main title letters picked out in the Italian national flag colours to match the tricolour stripe which runs around the top of the body shell and finally, Photo 14 is an example first primed with Vallejo Grey Primer followed by an airbrushed two coats of Vallejo Ferrari Red and a coat of gloss varnish to seal it all down and provide a better finish for the waterslide decals. The lettering was picked out (very carefully) in Mig Matt White.
The final stage will be to make up a wooden plinth for the painted cast plates to sit in, and that comes in the next instalment!
Until then, (not so long I hope) Blushing Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Nameplate construction pic 1.JPG
Nameplate construction pic 2.JPG
Nameplate construction pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#303 Posted : 01 January 2024 22:21:22

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Joined: 03/10/2012
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Location: Plympton
Once again, apologies for the delay and a Happy New Year to you All! This time it was due to some ‘alterations’ to my attic workroom. As I have now joined the ranks of the grumpy old (sorry, highly revered)Flapper pensioners and I am expecting to receive the benefits of all those years of private pension contributions (as meagre as they might have been) I have finally been able to do something I’ve wanted to for a long time (no, not buy every kit I always wanted but could never afford – although the thought is still nice!BigGrin ) I’ve gone solar!Cool Before there was not much point as our roof alignment is east and west not north and south, but the modern pv panels work much more efficiently now and still give good results even not directly facing south. We also went for an 8.4kWh storage battery too, the problem was both the honking great battery and the pv inverter/meter/isolator all have to be fitted to the chimney breast up in the attic! This meant one of my tool racks is now sitting in a cardboard box along with all the tools and the pine cladding which formerly enclosed that side of the chimney is languishing down in the conservatory (can’t have any combustible material above the electrics). Fortunately the solar people couldn’t run the power cables down the exterior wall to the meter under the stairs as is normal due to the upvc cladding on the wall so they ran it down through the attic floor and down the stairwell inside which meant I didn’t have to shift everything under the workbench which sits up against the end wall (that’s a heck of a lot of shifting!)Blushing
Anyway, that battery is quite a useful hand rest for getting down the ladder and the sight of the smart meter dropping to zero when the sun comes out is brilliant!
Now, the one thing I find most difficult with wood working is sanding something smooth without accidentally incorporating an unwanted curvature onto the flat surface! So in Photo 15 we have my new acquisition – a Parkside disc sander. This is a really nice little machine, not too big as to be unwieldy on the bench and pretty quiet in operation too. Not shown in the photo is the vacuum adapter which sticks out the side and allows the dust to be sucked clean away as it runs. I really wish I’d had this when I was doing the old Victory’s ribs!Blink
Photo 16 shows the wooden pieces for the nameplate plinth or base. These are made from 2.5mm spruce which comes from a strip I’ve had for donkey’s years, (must be well seasoned by now!) One thing I was quite pleased with was the square border strip around the flat panel, I didn’t have any suitable square section so I cut them off the main plank with a steel ruler and craft knife, all the 45 degree joints were made by sanding the edges with the new sander’s platform set to 45 (not a rounded edge in sight!). As you can see in Photo 17, I may have moved up to power tools (Don’t cost as much to run now), but clamping pieces whilst the glue sets is still ‘old school’! Photo 18 illustrates the side of the plinth after the glue was dry and with an initial sanding down on the sander, I gave it another sanding with a finer disc after this shot was taken and since then I’ve also sent off for a pack of 100 discs ranging from very course down to P800 which is much finer still!
Photo 19 shows the smooth sanded plinth after three coats of spirit-based Dark Teak wood dye – I gave it a fourth for good measure before then applying three coats of clear gloss polyurethane varnish as shown in Photo 20. The final photos, Photo 21 to 23 shows the three nameplates sitting in the wooden base. To be perfectly honest I can’t decide between them! Each one looks just as good as the other when set off by the glossy wood so what I’ll probably do is to just sand down the edges of the three nameplates so that each one can sit in the recess and be changed at will. At the moment they will fit in but are so tight that pushing them down flat will mean they won’t come out again! All that remains now is the big base required to sit the car on and this will have to wait until I can get some board large enough (this is somewhat bigger than my usual bases!Blink ) So until then, and until I start the comparison ‘appendix’ to the diary, the final set of photos to follow (very soon) will be the shots of the finished model – watch this space!BigGrin

Until then, Happy New Year to you All! (And Happy Modelling too!)

Robin

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Nameplate construction pic 4.JPG
Nameplate construction pic 5.JPG
Nameplate construction pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#304 Posted : 01 January 2024 22:38:52

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Robin, thought you’d be interested in seeing this.

1:8 Scale Ready made Model

Your model runs rings around this one. Now, just how much would yours be worth. BigGrin

Mark
Plymouth57
#305 Posted : 02 January 2024 20:17:59

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of HonourRed Medal: Red Medal
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Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 2,054
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Location: Plympton
Hoooooooooow much? Blink Blink Blink
Considering that for the price of that one you could buy ten (and a half) full Centauria kits which, from the look of it are actually more detailed than this one even built straight from the packets! There's no brake lines on the front wheels for a start and none coming down over the gearbox for the rear set either, and the fact that there's no photos of the body shell removed to show off the full engine makes me dubious that there IS one under there!
Nice display cases though!BigGrin

Thanks for that one Mark!Cool

Robin
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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