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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
Plymouth57
#261 Posted : 01 April 2023 17:41:29

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The two sub sections of the right hand exhausts come, as you might expect, in the next two packs, Packs 85 and 86 as illustrated in Photos 15 and 16. After the same flash removal both pairs of pipes were test fitted onto the engine as seen in Photo 17. The final parts for both the exhausts come together in the next pack, Pack 87. This consists of a set of four end pipes, two poly bags, each containing a pair of sprung steel springs, and a bag of three Type J screws (one being a spare as usual), shown in Photo 18.
The ‘J’ shaped tube indicated by the arrow is the left hand rear exhaust, this is secured to the ‘empty’ triple joint half with the Type J screw and the two halves of the joint are then push fitted together indicated by the arrow in the following Photo 19. The join on the two halves is pretty good and didn’t require any filling. NOTE however that the two exhaust pipes for the rear sets are not identical or interchangeable!Blink They are not actually straight – each one has a very subtle curve inwards towards the centre of the engine – it’s not very pronounced but it is there to lead the end of the pipe onto the previously fitted pipe support bracket. I can’t remember if the screw end had a tab to prevent going on the wrong side, but if it didn’t (and you did) it won’t line up with the bracket!Blushing That bracket is shown in close up in Photo 20, as mentioned earlier, once the pipe is resting against that piece, the tube ends in the engine block are kept tightly in place.
The ‘S’ shaped tubes belong on the front set of pipes, they are fitted on to the triple joint by a simple push fit and I’m pretty sure there was a tab on each one to ensure they went on the correct side. All the pipes are on in Photo 21, you can probably make out that curve on the rearmost pipe, the front pipes curve up from the front joint to lie alongside the rear one (except that in real life they don’t – well not exactly, more on them next time).
With the pipes all connected up it was time to finally paint them. I had the perfect medium all ready to go – my last few tins of Pound Shop Pro Driver Grey Primer Car aerosols.
Funny story with this actually, after reading through Ken’s masterclass on achieving the heat discolouration effect on the stainless steel exhaust pipes I sent off for some bottles of Vallejo transparent colours to try the same. As soon as I’d ebay’ed off the order I discovered the damned T4 had switched to ceramic coated exhausts which were a plain grey colour and didn’t discolour under intense heat!Cursing
Anyway, the result of the spray canning was as shown in Photos 22 and 23. Which I have to admit, came as a total surprise to me! The last time I mentioned these paints was years ago when I was singing the praise of how they were the best spray cans for a dead flat light grey primer I had ever found. I don’t know if these things alter with age, they must be seven or eight years old by now but instead of a lovely light ‘battleship grey’ and dead flat I got this semi gloss slate grey with a decided blue tinge. I have to admit though, whilst they looked horrible in my hands, when I tried dry fitting them on the engine as shown here they didn’t actually look too bad! In fact they matched quite closely with some of the reference shots of the exhausts as you can see in Photo 24. My own preference however was the lighter, matt finish similar to Ruda’s model as seen in another reference shot of the real thing in Photo 25.
The bestist matt grey finish I currently had was the Vallejo Grey Surface Primer so I decided to airbrush the slate grey pipes with that using my new No.2 airbrush – exactly the same as the No.1 except I bought one with a 0.5mm needle instead of the other’s 0.3mm (this saves all the changing around from one to the other, and besides, the airbrush rest on the compressor had two parking stations!BigGrin ) I thought the larger 0.5mm needle would cope better with the slightly thicker primer paint – which it did seem to do. The theory was, if it looked even worse I could simply re-apply the car primer again and go with that finish. The result of that second coat is shown in Photos 26 and 27 – a finish, which I thought did look much nicer. The only addition was a very muted application of the new MiG Blue-Black Enamel Wash along the joints, around the weld lines and into the crevices. I’ll show you a close up in the next instalment.
And also in the coming instalment, the most fiddly, curse raising piece of scratch building so far to finish off those exhausts!Cursing Blink
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Exhaust system pic 4.JPG
Exhaust system pic 5.JPG
Exhaust system pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#262 Posted : 02 April 2023 09:12:13

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Excellent work Robin, and a history lesson too.ThumpUp

Mark
Plymouth57
#263 Posted : 10 April 2023 15:25:09

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Many thanks for that Mark! There's a lot of history in this car reading through the Haynes Manual, the original 312T wasn't very popular with Ferrari's drivers and then each successive variant T2, T3 and the T4's became better and better, but then the final T5 proved to have too many changes, the drivers didn't like it and racing successes were few and far between!Crying
Anyway...
In the official instructions, the final job to complete the exhaust system is to add the two sets of springs, which secure the pipes to the bracket (and each other). As I mentioned earlier, even without these springs, the pipes are in fact quite firmly fixed in place already! There are two sizes of springs which came in Pack 87 – the shorter ones are used to wrap around the end of the pipes fixing them onto the brackets as shown in Photo 28. There are two little pegs on the reverse of the bracket, which the hook on each end of the spring locates over. This is a very fiddly exercise and the instructions actually state that you can remove the bracket, add the spring and then fit the bracket back on, pushing the spring over the end of the pipe if it proves too difficult. Unfortunately, a) my pipes are re-painted in matt grey which won’t take very kindly to having a steel spring rubbed along them and b) I’d already super glued the ruddy brackets on as they were a little on the loose side!Blink So I just had to persevere until the springs ‘sprung’ into place.BigGrin
Photo 29 illustrates the next part in the instructions – adding on the longer spring shown by the arrow (theirs, not mine this time!) The instructions have you simply wrapping the spring around the longer pipe, linking the two hooks and then sliding the spring back over the shorter pipe as well, ensuring that the join is on the inside, out of view. Again, the issue with scratching the paintwork would apply, if, I was just doing that. As you can see from Photos 30 and 31 however, those pipes do not in fact touch each other at all on the real vehicle. Instead of just the one big spring going around both pipes there are actually two smaller springs attached to an ‘x’ shaped spacer which keeps the pipes slightly apart. I know it’s only a little detail but what the heck, I’ve gone this far…!Blushing
The spacers were made from 1mm thick plasticard as seen in Photo 32. The next couple of photos are in the wrong order as I didn’t realise composing the photo pages that I had in fact taken a picture of the defective attempt but bare with me! The first attempt to create the hole seen here was made with a leather hole punch of the same diameter as the exhaust pipe (whatever that was!) Unfortunately although the punches work fine with thin plasticard, it cracked the plastic on the thicker 1mm sheet so the hole seen here was actually drilled out instead. The hole punch did however furnish me with a very useful item as seen in Photo 33 – the disc I’d punched out! This was used (with a centre drilled hole) to mark exactly where I needed to drill the second hole which is right where the disc is placed in this shot. That first attempt is finally shown in Photo 34 along with that disc and the second ‘x’ spacer is shown under way in Photo 35.
The first one was drawn freehand, the second was drawn around the first as a template. Using a safety razor blade cutter, the four straight cuts in orange shown in Photo 36 released the spacer from the rest of the plasticard and a further two vertical cuts (not shown) trimmed the excess off from the curved section which was then filed to shape with a diamond dust curved file. The two arms on each side were then drilled out to accept the spring hooks. Photos 37 and 38 show the test fitting on the pipes – as you can see, this was all done before the pipes were re-painted! Photo 39 shows a little jig I made up to try and make the fitting of the springs a little easier. By luck, one of the styrene tubes in the multi-sized set I bought earlier exactly matched the exhausts so I liquid poly glued two short lengths onto a plasticard base with the spacer resting between them to give the correct distance apart.
The two spacers were then painted as shown in Photo 40Vallejo Chrome all over with Mig Polished Metal for the darker section on the top. Note, there’s a couple of holes to be countersunk after this was taken!Blushing My initial plan was to cut down the longer kit spring to provide the two shorter ones. This I did for the outer springs, but that spring steel is an absolute pig to try and cut with snips and even harder to get the newly created end coil to bend up into a new hook! I managed to get the springs shortened for the outer half of the unit and to get the spacers fitted in between the pipes but the inner springs were a job from Hell!Cursing Cursing Cursing Although I could eventually get the springs reduced to fit on the plastic jig, trying to get the things to go around the inside of the pipes where there is no room to move about or get long nosed pliers or tweezers in to grip the ends was a nightmare! In the end I was forced to give up that idea and instead made new inner springs from the single strand electrical wire. Getting even those to fit wasn’t easy but at least the ‘springs’ weren’t actually springy so I could just get hold of the ends with the tweezers and pull them up to the tiny holes in the spacer arms and carefully thread them through. Photos 41 and 42 show the double springs in place from below and above and the final effect is shown with both sets of pipes fitted and ‘spaced’ in Photo 43. The final picture in Photo 44 shows that close up of the triple joints I promised with the (very) subdued Mig Blue-Black Enamel Wash applied around the weld lines and the crevices.
In the next instalment I can finish off that oil tank expansion set up by adding in the tubing back to the ‘can’ sitting on the rear chassis, for which I need the side pod bodywork panel which comes next in the instructions (for reasons which will be clear next time!)Cool
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Exhaust system pic 7.JPG
Exhaust system pic 8.JPG
Exhaust system pic 9.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
admin
#264 Posted : 10 April 2023 17:05:00
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More brilliant work!

Best,

Mark
delboy271155
#265 Posted : 10 April 2023 18:12:44
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That is some stunning detail in them pics.

Cool Cool Cool Cool Cool

WTG Robin,

Regards
delboy271155
(Derek)
COME BACK GUY FAWKES "YOUR COUNTRY NEEDS YOU"






tf64
#266 Posted : 11 April 2023 20:44:40

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Well-built Robin, is a pleasure to look at and read about this car.

Regards Trev.
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andali15
#267 Posted : 11 April 2023 20:52:59

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A well documented and pictured build. Looking in with great interest. Andy.
Plymouth57
#268 Posted : 16 April 2023 20:29:07

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Many thanks again to Mark, Derek, Trev and Andy for their kind words!Blushing Very appreciated!
The build itself is in the final stages at the moment although there's a lot more to come yet on the diary!BigGrin She's really starting to look like a real Ferrari now with Ferrari Red appearing all over the place. As you'll see in the following instalments I've actually changed some of the colour scheme from the kit supplied one - using reference photos (of course) and it's all coming together nicely!Cool
OK, on she goes!....
The quite hefty looking tubing which comes from the oil tank back to the rear mounted ‘can’ is shown in Photos 1 to 3. This apparently comes in a few colours – 1 and 2, which are the same car, show it in black, in Photo 2 you can actually see it going on to that can. I’ve also got some other shots of it in a turquoise-blue and, as shown in Photo 3 in a lightish green. This is the one I’m going for because I found a suitable green silicone, soft rubber tubing on ebay!BigGrin (£2.25 a metre)Cool
I’ve held off actually fitting the tube on until now because the construction of the side body panels are slightly different in this kit compared to the smaller Tamiya version (which is where I got the location for the tubing from) and I wasn’t sure if the tube would fit on the same. Photo 4 shows the part of the Tamiya instruction sheet for the T4 and as you can see, the oil tank comes complete with a moulded on peg right on the centre line of the rear face.
The first two parts of those side panels come in Packs 88 and 89 as seen in Photo 5. These are the top sections of the panels (with the very first splash of Ferrari Red on the whole kit) and each one consists of the main unit and a smaller sub-section, which is secured with a pair of Type J screws. The part I was waiting for comes second in Pack 89 and is shown in Photo 6 after screwing on that triangular panel which forms the outside of the radiator (cleverly concealing all that extra detail I added to it!)Crying The panel was test fitted to the chassis as shown in Photo 7 and as you can probably make out, if I had placed the tube onto the oil tank as per the Tamiya example, that panel wouldn’t have fitted on!
There were two options here, either cut out a semi-circular space on the edge of the panel and fit the tube where it should go, or just move the connector inboard a touch to avoid the panel, without having to adapt it. Move it, it was then!BigGrin
Photo 8 illustrates the two ‘connectors’ of the green tube. At the top is the intended version, a short length of aluminium tubing which would have fitted into a drilled out hole in the tank, probably with a plasticard ‘washer’ so it didn’t just ‘stick out’ with no obvious attachment. Of course, once the entire exhaust system was in place, I couldn’t get at the tank to drill it out so that one was out. At the bottom is the new and improved version. This consisted of a very short length of styrene tube which luckily was just the right size for the silicone tube to press fit through, together with a slightly larger plasticard disk onto which the tube was liquid poly glued. The new connector was then painted with Vallejo Chrome and Blue-Black Enamel Washed as seen in Photo 9. As shown in Photo 10, the flat-bottomed connector was simply super glued into position slightly inboard of centre, the green tube was also thin super glued into the connector as well. The tube then runs below the air intake shelf, shown without the side panel in Photo 11 before curving up around the end of the panel as seen in Photo 12. This is shown again from below in Photo 13. Then comes the needle work part! Like weaving on a loom and following the various ref photos, the tube passes under the gearbox cable running back from the right hand cockpit, under the gearbox control rod, under the external battery connector positive cable and then over the starting motor cable going back to the ECU. It then swings around the brake scoop, passing under the big black tube coming from under the gearbox radiator and also under the smaller oil lines on their way back to the rear wing support before finally plugging on to the intake tube on the can itself (Photos 14 and 15.) This is apparently a simple friction fit, there doesn’t appear to be any jubilee clip or other screw up fastener in any of the reference pictures. This is the last part of the basic chassis to be added in and the whole model then appears as in Photo 16. I’ve taken a whole series of ‘finished’ photos on this background as from now on, the rest of the model is effectively covering up what’s already there (to a greater or lesser extent) and I thought it would be nicer for the finished model gallery photos to have her both ‘naked’ and clothed for her photo shoot!Blink BigGrin
The final Photo 17 shows the next piece to come in Pack 90, which is the lower section of the right hand side panel. I had a lot of thinking about the next stage and a possible up-grading – was it really necessary, would it matter, etc, etc. In the end I went for it (of course) and what I’ve done next, in my own mind, turned out to be the most effective improvement of them all! It really makes a great difference to the whole look of the model. For those of you wondering what that might be, what do you get if you mix polyurethane varnish and cotton wool balls together (apart from one hell of a mess!)Blink
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Oil tank can tube pic 1.JPG
Oil tank can tube pic 2.JPG
Oil tank can tube pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#269 Posted : 20 April 2023 15:04:17

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Once again, another wonderful and comprehensive update.
It's really starting to come together now. Love it.
tf64
#270 Posted : 21 April 2023 10:20:37

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Well done Robin, a complete master class.

Regards

Trev.
Work in progress: Tombstone (Scratch) - San Francisco 2. -The Mayflower ( scratch by plan).


























Markwarren
#271 Posted : 21 April 2023 15:46:46

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Utterly superb, I am now running out of words for this masterpiece.Drool Drool Drool

Mark
Plymouth57
#272 Posted : 23 April 2023 20:36:16

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Thanks to Roy, Trev and Mark for those fantastic words! You really know how inflate a modeller's ego!!BigGrin Blushing Blushing Blushing
If you've liked it up to now, I think you're going to love the next instalment, I'm still working on putting it together (there's a lot of photos coming!)Blink
Until then, here's something I've been meaning to pass on to all you motor builders - although its too late for me on this one I finally found the perfect media for creating ultra realistic fuel lines (at least in 1/8th scale).
Its a product called Silicone Pole Float Rubber and is available on ebay, I found it whilst trawling around looking for various tubing and came across this in the angling supplies section.Blink
If you compare the trial tubing at the bottom of this photo compared to the kit tubing I used, it is brilliant! I stained the translucent white tubing with a thinned down solution of Vallejo Transparent Yellow and then washed out the brush in clean water and went along it again, removing almost all the paint and leaving this very faint yellowing effect. This silicone tubing is also softer and much more flexible than the kit tubing, as I said, its too late for this model, not only are the fuel lines buried under everything else that came after, but I also super glued some of them where they were a little loose!Blushing
That said, I would recommend this tubing to any still to build this beauty (or any other 1/8th scale vehicle) as a superior replacement to the kit supplied type. This is the 0.4mm size (internal bore), it also comes in 0.6, 0.8 and 1mm sizes and costs £1.50 for 1 metre (plus £1 postage)
See you all soon!

Robin

I think I forgot to compress the photo! Sorry about that, I'll re-do it when the next instalment is ready! There, that's better!BigGrin Blushing
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Perfect Fuel Line.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Eagle
#273 Posted : 26 April 2023 13:18:38

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Robin; this is a wonderful series you have chosen to share with us, thank you for your detailed reports. I would like to follow your upgrades next winter when I build my second Ferrari 312T4; is there a website or Facebook page with all of this detailed information?
Plymouth57
#274 Posted : 26 April 2023 21:05:47

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Hi there Eagle!
Many thanks for your kind words! If there is such a site I haven't found it yet!BigGrin
The diary and build is the result of many (many) hours of trawling through lots of sites with a little bit of info here and a little more somewhere else plus some other modelling forums which I've looked through to see how others have done theirs (mostly the smaller Tamiya kits).
I'm getting towards the final bits now and when I'm there I'm going to try and put together some additional pages with diagrams explaining where all the plumbing and cabling goes based on what I found on loads of photos from different angles. When that's done I'll then go back through the diary text and add in some pointers to those diagrams to hopefully make it a bit easier to make sense of it all (plus some bits that had to be slightly 'modified' later on in the build!Blushing
The Haynes Manual on the 312 series was of some help, but it has far too much on the politics and characters and nowhere near enough on the actual car itself. I found far more on the internet!

Best of luck in the winter!Cool

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
admin
#275 Posted : 27 April 2023 05:57:18
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Hi Robin,

Given the nature of your posts, I suspect the build log is cached off of this site in some form? It would be awesome to see it in its entirety, commercial free as it were.

Best,

Mark
roymattblack
#276 Posted : 28 April 2023 09:29:00

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An incredible build and an incredible diary.
Absolutely amazing.Love
Plymouth57
#277 Posted : 04 May 2023 20:34:12

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Many thanks again to Mark and Roy! I'll give that some serious thought Mark, it would be an interesting exercise to compile a full diary/how to on this monster using screen shots from the official instructions alongside my own photos and text showing the differences between the stock build and the upgraded!Cool
It's almost there now (here I mean, not on the diary yet!)BigGrin

Going back to that photo of Pack 90, I didn’t describe the contents so we’ll start with that one again as Photo 1! What we get is the right hand bottom section of the side pod along with two solid metal rods, each of which is drilled and tapped in the ends to take the Type H flanged screws in the little polybags. These will literally go right through the entire car from one side pod, through the chassis and out through the opposite side pod securing the whole thing together. On the bottom left is a separate half-cylinder which is fixed to the floor of the pod at the front for the metal rod to pass through. The rear rod simply runs along the floor of the pod without any such enclosure.
The big upgrade I had been thinking about for some time involves the actual finish of these side pods. The kit finish is a simple smooth black plastic – however, these side panels on the real vehicle are made from fibreglass mouldings – beautifully smooth and polished on the red outer surfaces but what has been described as ‘raw fibreglass’ on the insides. As you can see in Photos 2 and 3, there is a definite texture to the panels – a smoother ‘nobbly’ finish on the top, especially under the air intakes and although not especially clear in those pics, a fibrous texture on the insides.
I had hunted around for ages trying to find a way to simulate these finishes, one modeller on another F1 modelling site used static grass, which did indeed give a texture to an otherwise smooth surface, but not exactly what I was looking for. I’d almost given up and decided to go for the ‘nobbly’ effect all over (which you’ll see later) when I tried a last experiment and hit the jackpot!BigGrin Be aware though that, as shown in Photo 4, at least one example of the 312T4 had smooth Ferrari Red intake floors. I suspect that this is another modern classic car shot, as the kit version is all black (when, like the top panels they could easily have painted that part in red if it was), I’m going with a black interior! Plus I didn’t notice that pic until after I’d started!Blushing
First though, a slight alteration to the wooden support. Photo 5 illustrates the car supported on the original design with the pair of top panels temporarily fitted on, this was during the fitting in of the green tubing. At this point it became obvious that the rear wheel support in the centre of the tyre, although the best position for all the work being done on the rear, was going to be a problem when the side pods went on – they wouldn’t fit! The solution was simple however, as shown in Photo 6, I just made a new centre block of wood, which moved the supports out to the outer rim of the tyres allowing the side pods to fit on later. The new centre piece is 22cm across.
So before explaining the raw fibreglass texture, here’s the nobbly one first. Photo 7 shows what I eventually hit upon – a bag of Fillite Powder I’d bought some while ago. This is an extremely fine substance, just a little courser than talcum powder composed of hollow micro spheres which are mixed into epoxy resin during the mixing to bulk up the resin and make it lighter – I haven’t actually used it for that yet!Blink
I first tried a trial using a sheet of black plasticard as seen in Photo 8. I painted a strip with Humbrol Clear Gloss Enamel Varnish, let it go tacky and then sprinkled half of the sticky surface with a very fine aquarium sand (the browny side) and the other half with the Fillite. The resulting piles of material were then pushed down to flatten them onto the varnish and the excess tapped off. Photos 9 and 10 show the trial section after giving it a night to dry and then spraying it with a can of Poundshop Matt Black Car Primer. Photo 9 is just the primer, Photo 10 is after a dry brushing with Mig Sandgrau (Sand grey) acrylic. In both photos, the actual finish is much darker than it appears here. The finer Fillite powder gave the better finish although if I ever do a diorama with modern flat roofs that aquarium sand is a definite contender!BigGrin
With the nobbly finish sorted out I carried on trying to get the fibreglass ‘matting’ effect. I tried one attempt using pva glue and some soft polyester filling material but that didn’t work – the pva just didn’t have the pulling power to stick the polyester down flat. Then I hit it – this is where I switched to the gloss varnish (this came before the nobbly one) and instead of the polyester I tried good old fashioned cotton wool! I’ll explain the exact procedure as we go but Photo 11 illustrates the first attempt, again after the matt black car primer and the sandgrau dry brushing (and also lighter than it actually appears).
The first job was to push on the half cylinder onto the front of the lower panel as shown in Photo 12. Both sides have an arrow printed on the piece pointing to the front of the vehicle, seen in the centre. I chose to add some liquid poly to the two pegs and along the sides just to be confident the thing wasn’t coming loose later and once the glue was set it was time to begin ‘fibreglassing’. The final Photo 13 shows the first stage, painting the areas arrowed with the Humbrol Clear Varnish – NOTE, it has to be gloss – matt or satin will tend to dry out too quickly giving an uneven sticky-ness when the cotton wool is applied.
In the following instalment we can get to grips (literally) with the cotton wool and transform it into the raw fibreglass texture (time consuming but very effective!)Cool
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.


Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Side Panels pic 1.JPG
Side Panels pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
tf64
#278 Posted : 05 May 2023 10:09:52

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Hi Robin,

Hard to think what to say, but this has got to be modeling history in many modelers' eyes, the way you have got around all aspects plus your own added parts, this model is so clean and tidy, I think we would all like to shake your hand on this one.

Regards

Trev.









Work in progress: Tombstone (Scratch) - San Francisco 2. -The Mayflower ( scratch by plan).


























Plymouth57
#279 Posted : 08 May 2023 16:13:34

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Well that has to be the most gratifying comment ever on a modelling forum!Blushing Blushing Blushing
My cheekbones are aching with grinning and thank you so very much for that! Its been a real learning experience all the way through this model but its been worth it all the way!Cool Cool Cool
Its almost there now, just waiting for some last materials to arrive to correct a slight 'problem' down the line (you'll see why soon-ish). Anyway still more upgrading to come now....Cool


So carrying on from last time, in Photo 14 the application of the cotton wool onto the now tacky varnish begins. There was a time when you could go into your local Boots chemists (now called ‘pharmacies of course) and get a good old fashioned roll of medical cotton wool as used in first aid. Now all I can find is silly little cotton wool balls used for makeup removal! As you can see down the bottom of the photo, these ‘balls’ are actually little bales or rolls of cotton wool which, with a little patience, can be unrolled to give small sections of flat cotton wool ‘pads’. If you can get the bigger medical rolls get them! It’ll be a lot less bother!
Anyway, the cotton wool is applied over the sticky areas and pressed firmly down onto the plastic. It is then left to dry – overnight if possible. Once dry, the next job is to try and remove as much of that cotton wool as you can as seen in Photos 15 and 16. This was the first go at this process and I learnt as I went that the more you can get off, the better and easier the end result will be. By the end it was a case of ‘if you can see the black plastic through the white cotton that’s about right (in other words, a lot less than you can see here!)BigGrin
Photo 17 shows the right hand lower side completely covered in the cotton wool. Temporarily fitted onto the chassis via the two steel rods. The arrow is pointing to where the rear rod passes through – note there is no cotton wool applied in the moulded channel! Also note what I meant about having to widen the rear wheel wooden supports to accommodate the body work!
The next stage is even messier. As shown in Photo 18, the cotton wool now gets a second application of gloss clear varnish. This is brushed on quite thickly, working it into the cotton wool and flattening the fibres down to the plastic in the process. This is basically copying the actual glass fibre construction process but instead of glass fibres being immersed in an epoxy resin, we are immersing the cotton fibres in polyurethane varnish. As I said, later on I was leaving far less cotton wool on the parts than shown here and when the cotton turned transparent under the varnish that was enough!
Photo 19 shows the front of the side pod. This was after the red livery sections had been masked off and the newly dried fibre glass texture was sprayed with the matt black car primer. I’d added a little extra cotton wool over the glued on half cylinder to camouflage the join and had just painted over the front part with Mig Satin Black which is why it’s a little glossier in this pic, (I wasn’t going to mask everything up again just for that little spot!) The whole of the inside face is covered and sprayed in Photo 20 which just left a careful dry brushing with Mig Sandgrau to bring out the texture as shown in the close up in Photo 21, as before, the camera tends to over emphasize the lightness here, its actually quite a bit darker to the eye.
With the bottom section looking good, it was time to switch to the top half. This was going to be a ‘two tone’ effect with the cotton wool texture on the sides and underneath and the nobbly Fillite powder on the top surfaces. First though a quick look at how the top section cleverly fits around the side mounted radiator. This is shown in Photo 22. The front of the radiator is moulded with three brackets protruding from the edges, two on the front and one on the side edge. The top panel has to be carefully flexed into position with the open slot on the front clipping into place both over and under the lip of the radiator, which, as seen here, produces the effect or illusion of the brackets being fixed to the panel! That flat smooth area of black to the right of the red painted flap was left as it is, some of the reference photos do show this as pretty smooth but the rest of the panel apart from the vertical edge along the outer side and the pierced bracket sticking out towards the rear was coated (in sections at a time) with the polyurethane varnish. Photo 23 illustrates the top surface being sprinkled with the Fillite powder, this was the last section, the underside and vertical surfaces had already been cotton wooled by then. Photo 24 shows the complete right panel coated and ready for masking off and car black primer spraying. The vertical top edge wasn't textured as that part actually fits down inside the lower panel when they go together.
After the matt black and sandgrau drybrushing the finished effect was as shown in Photo 25. Notice on the bottom right of the panel that there is no texture applied, only a thin strip at the top. This section fits around the oil tank pretty tightly and only the top few millimetres are visible on the inner face so better safe than sorry! Also note the little cylinder sticking out at the bottom – this is for inserting a screw into the top to secure the top and bottom panels together – more on that one later!Blink
Before the final addition to the top panel, Photo 26 illustrates the difference between the textured right hand panel on the bottom and the stock finish left hand one above it. One interesting thing I noticed was that the right hand panel is engineered to fit precisely to the contours of the chassis and oil tank etc. The left hand one however seems to be a left over moulding from an earlier 312T series, that curved cut out behind the side radiator fits around the radiator pipework but not tightly at all. I suspect there was a curved tank fitted to the chassis at one point and this panel was designed to fit up against it just like the right one does around the oil tank. The design changed but the original panel didn’t interfere with anything so they just kept it as it was. Even Enzio would save money when he could!BigGrin
The final addition is shown on the real car in Photo 27, There are two steel bolts going through the top panel under the air intakes I have no idea if they are actually securing the panel to the intake shelf or even fixing a couple of pipe brackets for that green oil tank pipe going to the can on the rear. Anyway, they were nice and easy to manufacture, simple holes drilled down through the panel and a pair of the smallest of the steel screw bolts from my spectacle repair nuts and bolts set pushed through and super glued! They can be seen in the dry run test fit of the panel in the final Photo 28.
In the following instalment, bringing the left hand panels up to the same standard and then fitting them into place (not as easy as I thought!)
Until then, Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Side Panels pic 3.JPG
Side Panels pic 4.JPG
Side Panels pic 5.JPG
Side Panels pic 6.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#280 Posted : 14 May 2023 16:18:11

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Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 2,062
Points: 6,181
Location: Plympton
When you first begin this section, there is a warning in the official instructions stating: “We strongly recommend you do not try to fit them together before assembling them on the model itself, since trying to separate them again could damage them.” There are four fixing points on each side panel – a recessed press joint on the front corner, a peg and hollow cylinder joint towards the rear together with a flat bracket on the top section which push fits into a slot on the bottom and a single screw fixing towards the centre with a hollow cylinder on the floor and a smaller hollow cylinder above it into which the Type J screw is inserted. As with many of the push fit joints on this model they are ‘single use’ joints which are nearly impossible to take apart again. This is why I had to do all the fibreglass texturing before assembly! The act of fitting the upper and lower sections together effectively encloses the entire exhaust pipe assembly, so you can’t fit the panels together first and then fit them to the car!Blink Photo 29 illustrates the rear joints after pushing them fully home. The arrows indicate the peg joint under the air intake shelf and the bracket on the side This leads to the problem with the instructions. After fitting the two panels together and sliding the two steel rods through the chassis, the instructions then say to insert and tighten the Type J screw. The problem is – HOW?Confused Once the two halves are joined and the rods are inserted there is no space between the side panel and the oil tank which is where the screw cylinder is situated! Photo 30 shows this area, what looks like a gap between them is actually just the part of the oil tank sticking up above the side panel, the actual gap here is not as wide as the head of the screw let alone a screwdriver to screw it down with! In the end I simply left the screw out altogether – the rear push fits, the front recess and later on the two flanged screws into the sides of the panels was more than enough to secure the panels (plus the Type J on the left side was perfectly easy to get at so there was no such problem over there!)Cool
Also in Photo 30, notice that asbestos joining ‘blanket’ around the oil tank to radiator pipe in between the side panel and the chassis – that was an addition to the kit that now unfortunately got in the way of the panel! I needed to shave off some of the thickness of the blanket just below the visible part, including part of the jubilee clip to allow the panel to fit close to the chassis. Fortunately, with a touch up of the paint it is not noticeable at all after the panels are on.Cool With the right hand panels finally fitted on, the chassis of the 312 is suddenly a lot wider as seen in Photo 31. You can see here how the exhaust pipes emerge from the fibreglass body work in this shot.
Photo 32 shows the two sections of the left hand side panel before the fibre-glassing, they are simply placed one on top of the other here and the enlarged insert shows the position for the Type J screw that fixes the two halves together. This is exactly the same location as the right hand side, which, as I mentioned is completely blocked by the oil tank! Both sections are seen after the texturing in Photo 33. Note that the inside face of the side isn’t textured – there’s no point really as this area is completely hidden when the panels are in place and also, the top panel fits inside the bottom one at the top!
Photo 34 is a view looking down into the oversized curve around the radiator pipes which shows that fixing screw down tight. After the panels were on I painted the screw head with a gun metal acrylic just to dull it down a touch. Before the top panel was attached it also received a couple of tiny metal screws as shown in Photo 35. As I mentioned last time, fitting the completed side panels onto the chassis was not quite as straight forward as I’d anticipated. There were probably two reasons for that – firstly, was the extra layer of texturing I’d applied over the panels, that might have affected the way the steel rods were passing through from one side to the other but I suspect that the plastic mouldings for the panels might have had a very slight warp in them too! The reason for that being even once I’d cleaned out the holes through the panels and got the rods passing through (pretty tightly I’d have to admit), they still wouldn’t just slide through the chassis which without the panels in place, they both did without too much trouble. Photo 36 shows my assembled side panel fitting kit – a small (ish) jeweller’s hammer and my pin vice drill with a pair of drill bits the same diameter as those steel rods. I had to send off on Ebay for the longer bit, the smaller one is what comes as standard in drill bit sets but it wasn’t long enough to go right through the width of the chassis so I got an ‘extra long’ one of the same size. Photo 37 shows that extra long bit going through the chassis and Photo 38 is the front rod sticking out the left hand side after passing through the right hand panel seen at the top left of the picture. Even after the drilling through I still had to hammer the thing through which led me to think the panel alignment was possibly off due to a warp in the plastic. The left side panel was then attached, the top section first followed by the bottom being very carefully pushed on tight over the protruding rods until it was firmly in place. Then the rear peg and bracket were pushed in followed by the front red flap flexed over the radiator edge and the push fit on the corner, and finally the screw down inside the centre (magnetized screwdrivers are a must here!BigGrin ) Everything clicked into place nicely and appeared as seen in Photo 39.
There was one more extra addition to put on which will be coming next time, but to finish off this instalment, Photo 40 shows the final appearance with both side panels fixed in position with the T4 sitting on her own four wheels at last!
Until next time, Happy Modelling to you All!


Robin.

Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Side Panels pic 7.JPG
Side Panels pic 8.JPG
Side Panels pic 9.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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