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A Christmas Cutie Options
Plymouth57
#1 Posted : 15 November 2021 22:33:25

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A Christmas Cutie!

There have been a few brave modellers here on ModelSpace who have ventured into the dark realms of paper/card modelling, Budgie with his fantastic up-scaled Great War German Battle-Cruiser SMS Scharnhorst and Ken with his paper conversion of the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise into plasticard (of great interest to me as I have a British Battle-Cruiser of my own lined up for the same treatment), there was even some bloke who went to town on a paper and card Sopwith Pup (or two)!BigGrin
For those who have ever thought of dabbling in this genre, there is a brilliant website hosted by the Canon company (of camera and printer fame, not big guns) called Creative Park, just enter creative park into your search engine and then click on Papercraft to reach the categories. This site is packed full of extraordinary paper and card models from the very simple beginners models for children through to very complicated and highly detailed kits including animals and birds, dinosaurs, vehicles and dioramas – there is a huge collection of architectural models including all the main landmarks from Big Ben to the Sydney Opera House, Historic Japanese Castles and some incredible looking Japanese and Chinese Temples. The huge Cologne Cathedral for example consists of forty three sheets of A4 with a further twenty one sheets of instructions!Blink
And the best thing about these kits is – they’re absolutely free! You simply go to the kit you like and download the sheets to print them off. The downloads usually come in two sections; the actual parts to cut out and glue, and the build instructions to go with them. Some of the larger architectural models may have multiple parts downloads because of the sheer amount of pages.
As Christmas is rapidly approaching, (and I’m currently stuck waiting for a couple of new paints for the Ferrari before I can continue) I thought you might like to see (or even try) an example of an ‘easy to mid range’ little kit designed by a genius called Ayumu Saito, of a super cute Christmas Kitten emerging from a Santa’s bootie. This chap has designed many of the animal models on the site.
My first model was a dinky little Shih Tzu puppy and Mum’s recent visitors were so taken with him (and the bigger Koala Bear) that I thought I’d do this one up and hide it in their Christmas box when we send it up to them!BigGrin
Photo 1 shows the finished little chap, being me of course I couldn’t resist coming up with a little ‘enhancement’ which I’ll be adding at the end. The model stands about six inches tall and comes on a single sheet of A4 as seen in Photo 5.
There are three sheets of instructions of which the first one (Photo 2) is a general sheet showing the finished model with a set of tips and guides explaining what the various symbols on the plans mean. These are generally cut lines, mountain or valley fold lines, curving instructions and where to glue positions etc. Photos 3 and 4 show the actual ‘how to’ instructions and I’ll be referring to these as the build progresses. All the kits are copyrighted by Canon and the various designers but are allowed to be downloaded, printed and built, without any hassle.
This will be a real ‘quickie’ compared to my other diaries, probably about three installments – the main head assembly, the body (front legs) and Santa hat, and the Santa Bootie with a fourth one to show my individual ‘optional extras’. Hope you enjoy this appealing festive little chap (at least its something different!BigGrin ) And have a look at the Creative Park site – its packed full!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Christmas Cutie pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
birdaj2
#2 Posted : 16 November 2021 21:26:04

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Robin

That looks neat.

Must take a look on that site you mentioned as this looks like like its going to be the first ever christmas spent on my own, so trying to get my mind in focus for that and to try and plan what i am going to do with myself.

Maybe i will have a look at that big cathedral project you mention.

Tony
Happy Modelling

BUILDING: Hachette Spitfire Mk 1A, Constructo Mayflower
COLLECTING 1:200 Bismarck (Hachette)
SUBSCRIPTION COMPLETE (Awaiting building): USS Constitution, Sovereign of the Seas
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Plymouth57
#3 Posted : 17 November 2021 22:35:54

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Thanks for that Tony and sorry to hear you might be alone this year! I hope you'll find a whole lot to interest you on that site, once you start on one of these its very um, time consuming! - the Cathedral! Make sure you've got plenty of ink in your printer!BigGrin

Here's the first section:
Before starting, Photos 6 and 7 illustrate the benefits of using both a good quality card to print on and the better quality print mode on your printer. The example on the left which is the one used in the build was printed in a higher quality on my shiny brand new Epson ET2720 (one of the new eco-tank printers with fill-able ink tanks instead of those ruddy little cartridges) onto 140gm Supersharp coated card. The one on the right was standard quality onto 140gm basic white card. They will both make perfectly good models, but the extra sharpness and brighter colours make all the difference in the final appearance.
So to start the construction, Photo 8 shows the first piece on the instruction sheet. This is the main head section, the red lines indicate tabs that are glued together whilst the green lines show where curves have to first be added to the otherwise flat card. In this piece there is a general curve which forms the back of the head and two curves below the eyes to round off the face area. The actual piece is shown cut away from the A4 sheet in Photo 9 and cut to shape in Photo 10. The parts can be cut out with scissors but I prefer to use a modelling knife with a small pointed scalpel type blade. Its always best to start each paper model with a new blade if possible and where the cut is to remove a deep ‘V’ beside a tab (such as under the eyes seen here) I find it easier to cut from the outer edge into the V on both sides of the cut, starting from the bottom of the V outwards can sometimes tear the card instead of cutting cleanly. The pre-curving of the card can be seen in Photo 11, with the top of the head sitting proud of the mat. The first tab to be glued is the centre fold shown by the white arrow and the join is shown glued together in Photo 12, also illustrating the curve built in to the joint by the pre-folding. The best glue I’ve found is Deluxe Card Glue which I used on the two Sopwith Pups. It is a white PVA type glue which dries clear within a few minutes and has an almost instant ‘grab’ so you have to be accurate when bringing the two surfaces together! (If not, you can pull the two pieces of card apart straight away and re-glue), I apply it to the tabs with a cheapie natural bristle small brush. Despite it being titled a card glue it will also glue wood and plastic and even metal (when gluing it to card).
In Photo 13, the two tabs either side of the central join have been glued creating the rounded back of the head with only the front side tabs, the eyes and the chin at the front to complete. These are shown glued down in Photo 14. The next section is the kitten’s muzzle which follows the same procedure as shown in Photos 15 to 19. Just two simple curves on this part to round off the cheeks. The card can either be curved by finger pressure alone or, sometimes easier, smoothed around a suitable rounded object, for the kitten I used a selection of smooth paintbrush handles to achieve the curves (some are shown later). Where the tabs are passed under the card at a shallow angle as on this piece, a useful tip is to use sharp pointed tweezers to grip the tab along the fold line and then gently rotate the gripping tips to bend the tab down as shown in Photo 19. You can also use the same technique to grip the tab in place when gluing the card together until the glue holds fast (but make sure the tips are really clean and remove any earlier glue ‘splurges’ first!Blink ) Once the muzzle was dry, the top two blue dotted tabs located into the forehead slot and the single tab under the chin went into the slot down there. There’s enough room inside the head to be able to press the glued tabs against the inside of the head with fingertips. With the muzzle firmly glued in place the kitten gains a slightly pointed ‘catcat’ shape to his face as shown in Photo 20.
In the next installment, adding the ears and then moving on to the front legs.

Until then, keep well to All and Happy Modelling!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Christmas Cutie pic 2.JPG
Christmas Cutie pic 3.JPG
Christmas Cutie pic 4.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#4 Posted : 23 November 2021 21:22:50

Rank: Elite

Publisher Medal: Featured Build of the MonthActive Service Medal: 500 post active service MedalPurple Medal: Super active service medal for 1000 postsRed Medal: Red MedalTurquoise Medal: Turquoise Medal for model making know-how contributionOutstanding Build: An award for an outstanding buildBuild-Diary Medal: Build-Diary Medal of Honour
Groups: Registered

Joined: 03/10/2012
Posts: 1,913
Points: 5,739
Location: Plympton
Carrying on then from the basic head part we come to the ears. Photo 21 shows both the instruction diagram and the actual parts. As seen in the instruction there is a single curve to the main middle section of each ear with a simple ‘mountain fold’, ie, the printed side is folded down onto the plain back of the cut out shape. Both ears are shown cut out and curved/folded in Photo 22, note here how the tab with the green dot is glued under the printed, opposite side of the ‘inner ear’, when this is done (and it takes a little perseverance to get them to line up properly - have a few dry runs), this imparts a natural concave curve to the ear’s overall shape which can be seen in Photo 23 after the two blue spot tabs have been glued to the inside of the head through the pair of slots. This is a good place to mention another little ‘cheat’, actually its not really a cheat as such as many more complicated paper kits actually tell you to do this!BigGrin When layers of paper or card are overlapped or butted up together on their edges, despite the media being ‘paper thin’Flapper they do still have a thickness which can stand out as a white line against or through the printed parts. In this case, the top edge of the ears is composed of three pieces of card coming together. The solution to avoid the white lines is to pick out or mix up the closest colour you can get and carefully paint it out! In the case of Kitten’s ears I used a bottle of Mig Ochre Brown acrylic which matched pretty well (I used the same technique on the card Sopwith Pups although I was forced to mix and match to achieve the doped linen undersides!)
That completes the kitten’s head and the next step is to make up the front legs and what little of the body is coming out of the boot.
This is a single piece of card as shown in the instructions in Photo 24. There are two opposing curves in this one, a large one which essentially forms the back and neck of the kitten and two smaller curves, one in each leg to round them off. The part is shown in Photo 25 and again, cut out and curved in Photo 26. The small tabs on the sides of the toes overlap and when glued pull the paws into the bowl shape seen from the inside in Photo 27 whilst the two tabs joined by the red arrows once joined and glued produce the front or chest of the kitten which is later covered by the head and chin when the head is fitted on.
In the next instalment that head is fitted on, and we can start on the cute little Santa hat.

Robin.

Just checking, can anybody else get the photo to come up? This is my first posting on my new windows10 machine, the procedure for attaching seemed the same and the text came up ok but I can't get the photo to appear! (More work in progress I think!)
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Christmas Cutie pic 5.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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