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Up-grading the Del Prado 1/100 Victory Options
Gandale
#301 Posted : 08 October 2013 22:28:52

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Plymouth57 wrote:
Many thanks to all the above for their great comments!Blushing

This is just to announce that there is now an A-Z index on page 1 of the diary. At the moment it is just a printed version but I will be getting it 'linkable' as soon as I can (thanks to Gandale's very kind help and instructions!). Once it's up and running it should make getting around the diary a little easier! BigGrin
The second quarter deck hammock net is now finished and the quarter deck is now in the process of filling up with hammocks!

Back soon and Happy Building!

Robin

PS My damned IE is STILL freezing up at the most annoying moments!! Cursing


Hi Robin, just had a look at your index and it looks superb... Will take you a little while to create all those links but will be worth the effort... Happy to hear I was of some help to you....Cool Cool .. Good luck in its compilation....

Regards

Alan
sparks
#302 Posted : 09 October 2013 00:00:23

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Nice index Robin.ThumpUp
Regards
Alan
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ian smith
#303 Posted : 09 October 2013 17:08:02

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Hi Robin.
Great work on the hammock netting. Look forward to seeing more of your excellent build. Ian Cool Cool BigGrin
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Plymouth57
#304 Posted : 13 October 2013 17:06:36

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Many thanks to Ian and the Alans, glad you're enjoying my efforts still so here we go again! BigGrin

First of all, a couple of changes which have arisen as the hammock nets construction has evolved. The lashing up of the netting on the first three frames I made up were done using my usual combination of my own reading glasses backed up with a pair of cheapie reading specs perched on top. Although it worked very well, it was quite a strain on the eyes. For the last quarter deck frame, I tried a different approach which worked even better.
Photos 1 and 2 show this alteration using a lovely great magnifying glass attached to it’s own fold up stand. This is a very useful instrument which is one of two that I bought from the local Tool Shed store some years ago, the other one is about half the size of the one pictured here. The bigger one seen here is about 6" square with a 4" diameter glass, at about £2.99 if I remember correctly, a very cost effective tool! As you can see, the brass strip with the hammock frame stuck onto it is still held by the ‘helping hands’ but it is now supported under the big magnifying glass which gives a greater eye relief for the threading of the cotton as you can see in Photo 2.
Photo 3 is another view of the previously made up poop deck frame and hammocks.
After the netting was completed, I then made up a large number of the milliput putty hammocks to line the nets with. This I did in two separate sessions, the left over hard hammocks from the poop deck barricade were used to line the bottom of the quarter deck nets and the newly made up softer ones went into the waist barricade and the top layer of the quarter decks where they could be gently moulded into place almost like making up scale sandbags. As you can see in Photo 4, my last mixing of the epoxy putty left me just three hammocks short of the total I needed! No problem however, when I’ve made up the forecastle frames I’ll just put the next three hammocks in to fill up that gap first!
Photos 5, 6 and 7 shows the quarter deck now protected by the filled up hammock nets, it really makes such a difference to the overall ‘look’ of the decks, much more ‘businesslike’ with the hammocks in place and the true purpose of those frames and nets becomes obvious. If anybody is still deciding whether to fit their nets with scale hammocks or just leave them empty, I would definitely go with filling them, it really brings any Man’o’War model to life!
The last little Photo 8 is simply a blow up of the netting being lashed to the frame as in Photo 2, I just needed something to fill in that last blank square and that fitted in well!
With respect to Photo 6, I still have to fit the tiny cross pieces in at the top, something I’ll probably leave until all the nets are done and then do them all together.

Thanks to all for looking in, be back soon, probably with the forecastle frames.

Happy Building to all.

Robin



Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Quarter deck hammocks construction pic 1.JPG
Quarter deck hammocks construction pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
sparks
#305 Posted : 13 October 2013 20:53:31

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Nicely done Robin.ThumpUp
What would we do without our magnifying glasses, I have a large adjustable arm one with fluorescent light around the perimeter, at my age I need all the help I can get BigGrin
Regards
Alan
England expects that every man will do his duty.
Gandale
#306 Posted : 13 October 2013 22:47:27

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Lovely work Robin and have to agree with you on filling the netting with hammocks, looks so much more business like as you say.... Drool Drool .. And with my aging eyes I find the use of optivisors to be invaluable, wouldn't be without them and sometimes I even forget they are on my head.... get some strange looks when I answer the door....LOL LOL LOL .. Using them has meant I haven't had to bother with a magnifying glass.... Cool Cool

Keep up the great work.

Regards

Alan
stevie_o
#307 Posted : 13 October 2013 23:47:13

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ian smith
#308 Posted : 14 October 2013 00:53:59

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Hi Robin.
Looking very nice. Look forward to seeing more ian Cool
Current builds.Hachettes build the bismark,HMS Victory, HMS Hood.
Finished Builds Corel HMS Victory cross section.
Plymouth57
#309 Posted : 17 October 2013 22:20:24

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Many thanks again to Ian and the Alans BigGrin And just for you Stevie, we've posted again on the same evening! Spooky innit!Blink

Haven’t begun the forecastle netting frames yet but I have fixed a small error on the bow area which involved yet another simple little tip so I thought I’d stick this up first!
A little while back in the diary I made up and inserted a blackened brass ring bolt into the centre of the Marine’s Walk at the bow. Unfortunately, I didn’t check closely enough exactly where that bolt was supposed to go! In the McKay book, there was only the one detailed drawing of the Marine’s Walk which was a standard side view (or ‘elevation’ as it should be called), there was no corresponding top or plan view and, not checking other sources, I naturally assumed that there was a single ring bolt set into the centre of the framework. Naturally, (again) I was wrong! If I had looked closer at the double page Isometric drawing of the entire hull, I would have seen (as long as I had a magnifying glass) that there were actually two ring bolts, one on each side of the frame and not in the centre as I thought.
Bearing in mind that you can never have too many ring bolts on a sailing ship I decided not to yank out the first one but to simply add the two correct ones to the area and this is where the little tip comes in. Unlike the central bolt which was drilled right through the wooden frame I wanted to drill down into the wood but not through it this time and to do that I needed some kind of depth gauge for the drill bit.
In Photo 1 you can see the pin vice drill with two yellow bits added to the bit itself. The yellow material comes from the plastic insulation on a length of thin electric wire, 7/.02mm to be exact, (seven strands of wire of 0.02mm diameter, the standard sort of wire found in small electrical apparatus like radios and calculators etc.). The reason for the bit of insulation up in the jaws of the chuck is to allow those jaws to grip the .8mm bit tightly, the jaws are wearing out and won’t grip anything less than 1mm now! The tiny little piece of insulation on the drill bit itself is the depth gauge. It can be moved up and down the bit (carefully, or you’ll be swearing at it as well!) and checked against the thickness of the piece to be drilled into as in Photo 2 until the drill is just short of the bottom of the wood.
All that remains then is to hand drill (or use a rotary tool) down into the wood until the insulation touches the top surface of the wood at which point the hole is deep enough.
Photo 3 shows the two corrected ring bolts set into the Marine’s Walk with the extra one still in the middle. (You could always shackle a slovenly seaman to it as punishment!)
The final Photo 4 is nothing to do with this little exercise but is just to illustrate the Knightsheads tackle hanging over the bow netting with their short tails attached to the upper blocks. They will be left like this until I’m ready to add the full rigging lines at which point the tails will be removed and replaced with the full lengths of thread.
That’s it for now, after seeing Sparks beautiful Boomkins I’ve come to the conclusion that maybe I should have drilled the Knightsheads’ side holes for the locating pins before I glued them to the bow! Ah well! I wonder if anybody does a six inch long 0.8mm drill bit!!

Bye for now and Happy Building!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Depth Gauge Drilling pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Gandale
#310 Posted : 17 October 2013 23:03:50

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More innovative work for us to drool over Robin, love the depth gauge for the drill, definitely a tip I will use.... Drool Drool Great stuff....

Regards

Alan
sparks
#311 Posted : 17 October 2013 23:14:53

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Nice tip for the depth gauge Robin, I normally use insulation tape, but being an electrician, I should have thought of that Cursing
Re the boomkins, if you glue them to the knight head posts and the beak rail, I don't think they will be going anywhere BigGrin
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Alan
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stevie_o
#312 Posted : 18 October 2013 00:20:55

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Hans
#313 Posted : 23 October 2013 13:45:36

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And another brilliant tutorial to put to the test. Well done and thank you for your very informative tutorial.
Rgds, Hans
"It's okay to make mistakes. mistakes are our teachers - they help us to to learn, even if it is painfully"
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Plymouth57
#314 Posted : 03 November 2013 21:19:24

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Thanks again to Stevie, Hans and the Alans!

Just a quick update, I've been 'otherwise' occupied for the last week or two and haven't done much but I have managed to finish the foc'sl hammock nets and fill them up with their quota of hammocks.
All construction was the same as the earlier hammock nets with the brass rods and wire with the nylon mesh and cotton thread lashing finished off with the Milliput putty for the hammocks again.
As mentioned in the photo, the next job will be to construct the Anchor Palm Blocks which stick out over the deck just aft of the foc'sl bulwarks and then make up the waist area hammock nets, these won't be glued down though until I've finally made up the moulds to cast up the waist gun deck crew figures which will need to be placed into the waist before the hammock frames get in the way!

Back soon with more and happy modelling to all!

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Foc'sl Netting and Hammocks Pic 1.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
arpurchase
#315 Posted : 03 November 2013 21:23:44

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BigGrin BigGrin Looking good RobinCool
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sparks
#316 Posted : 03 November 2013 22:03:15

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Nicely done as usual Robin. ThumpUp
Regards
Alan
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Gandale
#317 Posted : 08 November 2013 23:52:03

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Hi Robin, can see your not dropping your standards... amazing work....Love Love

Regards

Alan
Foz
#318 Posted : 09 November 2013 09:13:48

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A real beautiful job Robin, a real inspiration. ThumpUp
petpole
#319 Posted : 09 November 2013 14:58:30

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Amazing work from you as always Robin.
Keep up the great build.

peter
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Plymouth57
#320 Posted : 21 November 2013 17:43:29

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Many thanks again to Foz, the Alans, Andy and Peter, much appreciated as always.!Blushing

I managed to get a bit done to the Ol' Vic this week, not the bits I had planned on but nontheless a part that I had been looking forward to doing for some time.
This post is a little 'wordy' and long but there was so much going in to this part I couldn't get away with it so apologies if it's difficult to scan between the text and the following photos! Blink

A slight departure from my planned work plan! Instead of carrying on with the anchor palms as mentioned before, I’ve skipped that little chore together with the waist area hammock frames and gone straight to the stern to work on a little extra project on the Poop Deck.
For those of you building the DeAg or for that matter any other manufacturer’s Victory except the Jotika masterpiece, this part of the ship will probably come as a surprise as it is completely different to the ‘standard’ Portsmouth version, but just as the foc’sl area is built up with raised bulwarks instead of the ‘Portsmouth Fence’, so is the stern along the sides of the Poop deck. At the time of Trafalgar, Victory looked more like the Santissima Trinidad than the ship currently in dry dock.
The difference is though, the stern additions were not a permanent part of the ships structure as in the foc’sl but a removable hull section designed to protect the six extra guns carried on the Poop deck before, but not during Trafalgar. What we have is, in effect a removable wooden wall, which was attached to the permanent hammock frames along the sides of the Poop by a series of iron brackets. This was removed after the battle during her refit and repair and was never seen again. Presumably, if the Victory is supposed to be rebuilt to her Trafalgar appearance in the future, we might see them back again one day, I hope so, with them in place she is actually a five decker!
The first step was to build the actual wooden barricades. In the Jotika kit I think they are made from five strips of wood but I used three strips of spare hull planking from the DelPrado kit. By a lucky coincidence, the planks were just over twice as long as the finished barricades so I created the panels by laying a couple lengths of masking tape down onto a nice flat piece of plywood and then gluing the three strakes together with a brass pin through each end and the centre of the outer ones to hold them tight against the inner plank whilst the glue dried. Next day I carefully removed the panel from the masking tape underneath and cut the two barricades out, losing the pin holes from the ends and centre in doing so. The two basic panels can be seen in Photo 1 below.
By Photo 2, the panels have been trimmed to the chamfered shape required to follow the Poop deck sides whilst keeping the tops more or less parallel to the deck. The three gun ports have been pencilled in and the two ‘enclosed’ ports have been drilled at their corners, the third gun port is lower than the others and is actually cut into the Poop sides so no drilling was required on that one.
Photo 3 shows the gun ports with their centres removed by simply using a safety razor blade and ‘joining up’ the drill holes. The third port is again not yet cut out as I didn’t want to weaken the panel until the other two had been filed to shape and the whole panel lightly sanded to remove any burrs.
Finally, Photo 4 shows the two finished barricade panels with all three gun ports and a little cut out at the stern which fits over the fixed horizontal pulley which is set on the extreme ends of the Poop sides (and yes, I finally had to make them up as well, a carved wooden block with a sliver of cocktail stick for the pulley inside!). The top panel is the port side interior in three coats of yellow ochre and the bottom one is the starboard exterior in two coats of Admiralty Dull Black. Unlike the main gun ports, the sides of the openings are painted black, not red ochre.
Photos 5 to 8 illustrate the construction of the tiny support brackets for the barricades. These are essentially the same as the trunion caps made for the cannon way back in the diary. Photo 5 shows a thin strip of DecraLed having been cut from the wider roll and the semicircular shape formed by simply pressing the lead down over a piece of 0.5mm brass rod (the same diameter as the hammock frames) with the two tips of a pair of tweezers. Once the shape is formed the strip is then cut to size using a safety razor blade as in Photo 6. The next photo shows the bent brass wire hammock frame with a bracket superglued into position and Photo 8 shows two of the frames with bracket being painted with the Admiralty Metal Black whilst held in spring grip tweezers.
Those of you who have built the Jotika kit might at this point notice a little non deliberate mistake which I didn’t realise until I had happily and proudly glued the first two frames into position at the forward end of the barricade but I’ll come to that a little later.
In real life, the hammock frames were securely fastened to the Poop deck sides and the barricade was lifted into position and dropped over the outer bars (God knows how but it probably involved lots of men and a whole lot of blocks and tackle!) I had been trying to decide how to best fix this set up in miniature for some time, did I fit up the frames first and then get the barricade to marry up to the frames or glue the frames to the barricade first and hope that they were all at the exact right height to meet the hull sides when the whole assembly was fitted to the hull? In the end I decided on a third method – I cheated!
Rather than have the barricade supported by the frames I decided to allow a mm extra which I then superglued directly to the last mm of the hull sides. This was done very carefully by cocktail sticking a thin bead of super along the extreme bottom of the barricade and then offering it up to the hull trying to keep the top as parallel to the deck as I could. Once it was fixed in place, I then keeled the hull over to the side as far as I dared by placing blocks of wood under one side of the kit stand and then ‘dribbled’ a little more super on the end of the cocktail stick along the joint underneath the barricade. Once done, that gave me a fairy strong permanent joint although I did get a very nasty single loud ‘crack’ when I inadvertently rested my wrist on one side when I was re-touching up the other!
With the barricades in place it was time to glue in the first of the frames, this was accomplished by placing a drop of superglue on the flat base of the frame and on all the backs of the brackets before carefully placing the frame into position with tweezers. The first pair went in fine and looked really good and at this point I went back to check the photo from the Jotika site for comparison. And that’s when I found the little mistake! It should have been obvious but I’ve often found that when concentrating on tiny little details, sometimes the larger picture is completely overlooked, (as in the case of the missing skid beams!). The barricades were hung from the brackets, and if all they had was a single bracket at the top of the frame the damned things would be rocking in and out whenever the ship rolled! And there, clear as day in the Jotika photo was the second bracket just up from the Poop deck sides! Adding the missing lower bracket didn’t seem like too big a job but boy was it a pig to do, trying to hold a tiny piece of lead about 2mm across with a spot of superglue to go where it was wanted was a nightmare, I tried using a small paintbrush with enough water on it to hold the thing and it kept dropping off or twisting out of line! In the end I used a long blunt needle with a tiny bit of sticky PVA to transfer the pre-glued bracket into position. Needless to say, all the remaining frames went in with two brackets apiece!
They were all painted as in Photo 8, the side which rests against the barricade with its TWO brackets, the flat base and about half of the opposite upright were painted and allowed to dry and then, using a different technique to the first examples, only the base was dipped into a drop of super and, held by the unpainted section of the frame it was tweezered into position against the barricade, a little above the hull and then gently lowered down into position following the pencil marked card guide. This method removed the tendency of the pre-glued brackets to mar the paintwork of the barricade and once the frame was stiff enough and upright, the brackets were fixed with a drop of super, allowing capillary action to suck the glue into place.
Photo 9 gives some idea of the actual size of these items, that’s my index finger next to one of the frames with a formed support bracket beside it, you might have some idea now of how fiddly it was trying to glue a single bracket to the barricade and frame in-situ reaching across from the opposite side of the deck!
In Photo 10 you can see the simple measuring gauge used to position the frames up against the barricades, it’s just a piece of white card pencilled in with the location marks for each frame member. I didn’t try to measure them from the Jotika photos, there were ten frames on each side, doing them at regular intervals would mean some of them would be stuck over the gun port cut outs so with the card in place I just marked it with one at each end, one either side of the cut outs and the remainder spaced evenly between the first and last. This is the starboard side in the photo, the card was simply turned through 180 degrees to become the port side guide. Although not visible in this picture, I did then add an arrow at the forward end of the card to remind myself which end was which!
Photos 11 and 12 are the finished result, which, I have to admit looks as good as I had hoped for! This addition really changes the whole appearance of the Poop deck and gives it a much more ‘belligerent’ look, even without the guns stationed there which were 18lb Carronades. The ‘3D’ effect of the hammock frames and brackets against the side walls even looks quite ‘delicate’ up against the rest of the Poop deck fittings which is a nice contrast (that reminds me, I have to sort out how to make some scale cleats fairly soon!) It’s a pity she didn’t carry the 18lbs in 1805, I wouldn’t mind scratch building half a dozen baby ‘smashers’ to go up there!
Next time (hopefully) the anchor palms will finally get done!

Happy building to all.

Robin
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Poop deck Barricades Pt 1 Pic.JPG
Poop Deck Barricade Pt 2 pic2a.JPG
Poop Deck Barricade Pt 3 Pic.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
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