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Chamferring Options
Miketcw
#1 Posted : 07 April 2010 00:08:11

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Hi all,

I just saw this kit the other day and decided I've always wanted to build victory and seemed like the sensible option - rather than buying a full kit outright. I did start making plans a few years ago to do a scratch build of victory (idea didn't last long), and like the almost scheduled approach this method will give. So that was my Hi and introduction. I am wondering how much customisation I / others are planning on doing to this project

Also has anyone thought about how to sort out the edges of (I believe the correct term is chamfer) the bulkhead sections to get a good fit with the planking.

Do most just do this by eye/trial and error or does anyone use any technical knowhow to work out how much to actually do?

Thanks,
tomo29
#2 Posted : 07 April 2010 15:12:56

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Miketcw wrote:
Hi all,

I just saw this kit the other day and decided I've always wanted to build victory and seemed like the sensible option - rather than buying a full kit outright. I did start making plans a few years ago to do a scratch build of victory (idea didn't last long), and like the almost scheduled approach this method will give. So that was my Hi and introduction. I am wondering how much customisation I / others are planning on doing to this project

Also has anyone thought about how to sort out the edges of (I believe the correct term is chamfer) the bulkhead sections to get a good fit with the planking.

Do most just do this by eye/trial and error or does anyone use any technical knowhow to work out how much to actually do?

Thanks,

welcome matey i am too new to all this so are a few ppl on this site and others hav been doing it for years so we are all going to help each other out with tips and things i think all the new ppl are planing a lot on this i know i all i hav went out to look for tools and paint etc
jonny7england
#3 Posted : 07 April 2010 16:54:05

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Miketcw wrote:
Hi all,

I just saw this kit the other day and decided I've always wanted to build victory and seemed like the sensible option - rather than buying a full kit outright. I did start making plans a few years ago to do a scratch build of victory (idea didn't last long), and like the almost scheduled approach this method will give. So that was my Hi and introduction. I am wondering how much customisation I / others are planning on doing to this project

Also has anyone thought about how to sort out the edges of (I believe the correct term is chamfer) the bulkhead sections to get a good fit with the planking.

Do most just do this by eye/trial and error or does anyone use any technical knowhow to work out how much to actually do?

Thanks,


Hi mate welcome aboard. we all have our own ideas of how we want our build to look and we have discussions to that affect. as for the chamfer or shaping of the hull, I personally do it by eye using a strake to gauge my progress until I think it is good enough to be permanently attached, others will probably give you their view on how to do the job, either way we learn from each other and there are some really good people on here. Best of luck with your build mate.
Current Builds: Deagostini HMS Victory: Deagostini HMS Sovereign of the seas. Completed Builds: Del Prado: HMAS Bounty: Hachette: RMS Titanic: Del Prado: Cutty Sark...
Capt Stedders
#4 Posted : 07 April 2010 17:26:29

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Hi, and welcome aboard.

As for your question, I have a feeling it may need to be done 'by eye' - however, there do seem to be a lot of bow formers, so as long as a degree of care is taken (along with stopping frequently to check your progress), you should be OK.

You will probably need a rubbing block (get a rubber one from a car accessory outlet) and plenty of sheets of various grades of Wet&Dry paper (P240 should get the bow job done without ripping too much away, too quickly).
Schnellboots on back burner

Tools.


karl1113
#5 Posted : 11 May 2010 14:14:43

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the chamfering is shown on my victory build on the first lot of frames/bulkheads.
you are all correct,you use a strake and work out how much you need to take off.
I then draw a pencil line around the area of bevel and use a medium grade sandpaper/emery paper to bevel,however,some of the bulkheads angle quite severly so I use a mini drill with a sanding attachment
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Current builds: SotS, USS Consitution, San Felipe, D51 loco, HMS Surprise, RB7, Arab Dhow, Jotika HMS Victory
Completed builds: HMS Pickel, Thermopylae, Mississipi river boat, Mary Rose, Cutty Sark, San Francisco II, HMS Victory x5, Titanic Lifeboat, Panart HMS Victory Launch, Hachette Titanic, Virginia Schooner, Endeavour Longboat.

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karl1113
#6 Posted : 11 May 2010 14:17:06

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[/quote][/img]
Current builds: SotS, USS Consitution, San Felipe, D51 loco, HMS Surprise, RB7, Arab Dhow, Jotika HMS Victory
Completed builds: HMS Pickel, Thermopylae, Mississipi river boat, Mary Rose, Cutty Sark, San Francisco II, HMS Victory x5, Titanic Lifeboat, Panart HMS Victory Launch, Hachette Titanic, Virginia Schooner, Endeavour Longboat.

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dtgray
#7 Posted : 11 May 2010 14:35:56

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karl, this is my first wooden build so I may be showing my inexperience here Smile but I thought it was best to leave the chamferring until all the rib sections were in place? Isn't it easier that way so you can lay a plank along all the ribs to test the chamfer? Confused
Regards,

David

karl1113
#8 Posted : 11 May 2010 15:02:16

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you can chamfer as you go,provide you check your bevels with a strake, those front bulkheads are the bow section, the middle sections won't need any chamfering.
you won't get a strake long enough to go the entire length,if your using scale length strakes, you will be glueing on 3" lengths.
Current builds: SotS, USS Consitution, San Felipe, D51 loco, HMS Surprise, RB7, Arab Dhow, Jotika HMS Victory
Completed builds: HMS Pickel, Thermopylae, Mississipi river boat, Mary Rose, Cutty Sark, San Francisco II, HMS Victory x5, Titanic Lifeboat, Panart HMS Victory Launch, Hachette Titanic, Virginia Schooner, Endeavour Longboat.

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dtgray
#9 Posted : 11 May 2010 15:18:03

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karl1113 wrote:
you can chamfer as you go,provide you check your bevels with a strake, those front bulkheads are the bow section, the middle sections won't need any chamfering.
you won't get a strake long enough to go the entire length,if your using scale length strakes, you will be glueing on 3" lengths.


Thanks karl BigGrin
Regards,

David

wallace
#10 Posted : 11 May 2010 15:27:02

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hi guys, i too am new to this ship building lark, can someone please tell me what a strake isBlushing
willie
#11 Posted : 11 May 2010 16:59:00

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Confused 3" stackes no thanks plank endsConfused landing between bulk heads
willz
#12 Posted : 11 May 2010 17:43:09

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good N willie
Mark
#13 Posted : 11 May 2010 17:45:15

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With due respect to Karl, I really wouldn't start chamfering the frames until the frame is complete. The traditional way is to take a plank and place it along the hull. Using the Mk1 eyeball, see how it lies, and sand the frames until the plank lies evenly, touching the full width of the frame. You need the plank to lay on at least two frame either side of the one you're bevelling to see how the hull will curve. You also need to chamfer all the frames at the same time to make sure you're getting the frames chamfered evenly. I take the bulk of the material off by eye, then use the plank to gauge the final shape.

You'll need some fairly round sandpaper to start with as there is quite a lot of wood to come off the frames, particularly around the bow. I start with 80 grit, and a sanding block is essential. Watch that you don't chip the edges of the ply with rough sandpaper though.

You need the frames all securely glued in place before starting to chamfer, as you can't work properly with the frames lose.

Karl's method obviously works for him and I'm not knocking it, but personally I would stick with the traditional method, and I think it would be easier for beginners. However, feel free to make up your own mind.
Mark
#14 Posted : 11 May 2010 17:47:35

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PS. A strake is another word for a plank used to plank the hull.

http://www.dictionary.net/strake
dedworthdog
#15 Posted : 11 May 2010 17:50:54

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I am hoping that this will be covered in the mag
Follow my build to learn how to make firewood

willz
#16 Posted : 11 May 2010 18:05:09

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i agree with mark on this one, i`m a beginner like a lot of us, and karl has the confidence and experience to do the chamferring first, but for us beginners, well, we cant stick it back on.
dtgray
#17 Posted : 11 May 2010 18:19:55

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Mark wrote:
With due respect to Karl, I really wouldn't start chamfering the frames until the frame is complete. The traditional way is to take a plank and place it along the hull. Using the Mk1 eyeball, see how it lies, and sand the frames until the plank lies evenly, touching the full width of the frame. You need the plank to lay on at least two frame either side of the one you're bevelling to see how the hull will curve. You also need to chamfer all the frames at the same time to make sure you're getting the frames chamfered evenly. I take the bulk of the material off by eye, then use the plank to gauge the final shape.

You'll need some fairly round sandpaper to start with as there is quite a lot of wood to come off the frames, particularly around the bow. I start with 80 grit, and a sanding block is essential. Watch that you don't chip the edges of the ply with rough sandpaper though.

You need the frames all securely glued in place before starting to chamfer, as you can't work properly with the frames lose.

Karl's method obviously works for him and I'm not knocking it, but personally I would stick with the traditional method, and I think it would be easier for beginners. However, feel free to make up your own mind.


Thanks Mark. Smile What you've said here is pretty much the way I understood it should be done, and that's the way I'll do it. As you say karl's method works for him, and he's experienced enough to do it with confidence, as for me I'll do it the easiest and safest way possible for someone with my lack of experience BigGrin BigGrin
Regards,

David

Tarbrush
#18 Posted : 11 May 2010 18:24:05

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Hi shipmates, I am still working on my first wooden ship and found that the frame chamfering was best done when the frames were assembled and glued in place. Al la Marks advice. The angles are complicated when not located. Think of it as shaping a solid block except you have a guide to work to namely one edge of each frame.Cool Bet you didn't think you would have to be a sculpture as well as every thing else.Laugh I used a file and sanding block, trying out the progress with a plank.BigGrin
It was tapering the planks that caused the most problems in order to get the b****rs to lie flat, but got there in the end. You can see the progress in "other build diary", "HMS Beagle, my first wooden ship, warts and all".Blushing Hope it helps.LOL
jonny7england
#19 Posted : 11 May 2010 18:27:23

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When I start construction on my Victory, I shall be inserting balsa wood in between the bow formers to increase the area for bonding the strakes to, does anybody else considering this a worthwhile pursuit? Unsure
Current Builds: Deagostini HMS Victory: Deagostini HMS Sovereign of the seas. Completed Builds: Del Prado: HMAS Bounty: Hachette: RMS Titanic: Del Prado: Cutty Sark...
Tarbrush
#20 Posted : 11 May 2010 18:42:00

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The frames should be close enough together not to need it Jonny.BigGrin The pins and glue should be sufficient for joint strength.Cool However if the strakes don't curve smoothly then the balsa would be a good idea in my book.LOL
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