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The DeAgostini 1/8th Scale Ferrari 312 T4 Options
kpnuts
#61 Posted : 31 July 2021 21:25:57

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Thats looking awesome Robin
Ken's the name modeling's the game.
Plymouth57
#62 Posted : 07 August 2021 20:48:26

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Many thanks for those kind words Ken and congratulations on your August build award which was so richly deserved!Cool Cool Cool (And also sincere sympathies for your great loss too).

Ok, stand by for my first big mistake in following 'simple' instructions!Blushing
So the first Photo 1 shows the reference set of 16 different types of screw and bolt fixings, which come with the kit. Alongside this and contained within the downloaded instructions is a full description of each one, giving not only its dimensions but also what it is intended to screw or fix into eg, plastic or metal. This is a very handy little reference set, not that any of these screws will need to be used of course – up to now (and hopefully onwards too) every time a screw or screws is needed, the kit has always supplied one extra in the little poly bags.Cool What I will be doing the next time I get into town (few and far between since the Covid started and I avoided the bus like the plague) is to get another couple of multi sectioned boxes, a bit like pill or tablet dispensing boxes, and mark them up from A to P to keep the screws safe and sound. At the moment they’re all in the larger box with the front wing section still in their poly bags.
Anyway, back to the build! The second Photo 1 (confusingly) illustrates the second set of parts for the other intake manifold, minus the trumpets, which were in the process of upgrading when this was taken. Both manifolds are seen screwed into place in Photo 2, those more eagle eyed than I was might just notice a definitely non-intentional mistake in there! I’ll come back to that later! On to the next pack in Photo 3 which, until now has been keeping its contents secret behind a plastic foam wrap. The one thing which was obvious, even without the instructions, was that this pack contained metal parts! As well as the pack of Type J screws, the two packages contain a die cast metal cylinder head each. Unlike the car engines I’ve ever seen which had their spark plugs along the top (or toppish) or my old moped with its single one stuck out the front (just waiting for the next deep puddle to come up like a tidal wave), the twelve on this monster come out the sides! Each one has a pair of tabs sticking out from the reverse which are used to screw down into, which was quite handy as I used them in a mini vice to hold the head for its Humbrol Blue-Grey Enamel Wash as shown in Photo 4. The difference between the standard kit finish and the wash can be seen in Photo 5. After giving the wash 24 hours to dry off, (it does stay quite tacky for some time), the first side was screwed down into the underside of the plastic engine block top as seen in Photo 6. The other screw at the opposite end is then screwed in as shown in Photo 7. With the first side screwed in tightly the assembly appeared as in Photo 8. The first one went in beautifully – the second side wouldn’t fit at all! No matter how I tried to insert it in place, it always ended up with the tabs a couple of mm above the plastic pillars on the engine block, if I screwed down anyway the side panel would have ended up at an angle, not ninety degrees like the first one. Only after double and triple checking it, did I finally discover the problem – I’d somehow managed to put the plastic panel under the trumpet rack on back to front!Blink As you can see in Photo 9, there are a series of semi circular cut outs in the side of the panel, which correspond to the raised bolts on the cylinder heads. Because the second manifold had its panel front to back, the cut outs were on the top edge not the bottom and the straight edge of the panel was blocking the bolts from fitting snugly! If you look back at Photo 2 you can just make out the panel on the right has those cut outs at the top whilst the left one is correctly fitted with a straight edge uppermost! I unscrewed the manifold and was able to very gingerly prise off the panel with a flat screwdriver and reverse it, pressing everything back down tight before screwing the manifold back in place (thank God I didn’t have to glue it in the first place!) With the manifold back (properly) the second cylinder block went in as easily as the first as shown in Photo 10.
So panic over! In the next installment, the biggest great piece of metal so far – the entire bottom of the engine block (which just about doubles the entire weight of the thing)!BigGrin
Until then, stay safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Reference Screw Set pic.JPG
Intake Manifold and Cylinder Heads pic 1.JPG
Intake Manifold and Cylinder Heads pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
kpnuts
#63 Posted : 08 August 2021 08:15:58

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More great work, and thanks for taking the time to describe and explain everything you are doing
Ken's the name modeling's the game.
Markwarren
#64 Posted : 08 August 2021 08:34:16

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Very nice update Robin, looking excellent.Love Love

Mark
Kev the Modeller
#65 Posted : 08 August 2021 17:31:32

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Very nice so far Robin. I bet you're enjoying this model race car building more than you first imagined you might and likely learning a lot of new techniques along the way as well?!

Well done, looking great. Cool ThumpUp

Kev.
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roymattblack
#66 Posted : 08 August 2021 19:25:41

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Another great update here.
I really need to start looking at my own sitting here in boxes.
It's clearly an amazing kit and you are genuinely doing it credit.BigGrin
goddo
#67 Posted : 08 August 2021 19:40:50

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Very nice and informative update, Robin.
Well done, sir.
Chris
Plymouth57
#68 Posted : 11 August 2021 20:50:58

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Sincerest thanks to Ken, Mark, Kev, Roy and Chris for those kind words!Blushing Blushing
I must admit though that when I logged on to check where I'd actually got in the diary (the diary pages and text are a little way ahead of this point as you'll see down below), my first thoughts were " 'ere, where's me diary gone!"Blink
It took a bit of feverish hunting to realize that the diary has been 'boosted' up to its very own section from the general motor vehicles section - yet another honour!Blushing Cool (Panic over!)BigGrin
I'm really glad you are all enjoying the progress and yes Kev, I am getting into this more and more, not only discovering more techniques on modelling the Ferrari but even learning how the actual engine was all connected up and what went where (if I can thread any more pipes and cables through that spaghetti infestation!)Blink
Really enjoying it though, and the projects that were supposed to run alongside the Ferrari seem to have taken a back seat for now!BigGrin
Anyway, just to whet your appetites, below is the engine where its at right now!
And Roy, its STILL in the boxes?Blink LOL
Back soon with some catch-ups!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Engine so far 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#69 Posted : 16 August 2021 21:01:37

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Continuing on from the crankcase top and sides, Photo 1 shows the big and weighty die cast metal crankcase bottom section. In this photo, after the initial soapy bath and dry off, the end facing the camera has just been given the Blue-Grey Enamel wash treatment whilst the rest of the casting is in its pristine chrome effect. Because of the size of this piece I gave it the wash effect in stages, so I would have somewhere dry to pick it up and hold it by, the first half of the main body has been done in Photo 2, any ‘join up’ marks on the top flat part didn’t matter as this will be completely covered by the Oil Sump which goes on next! After all three faces of the crankcase bottom had been enamel washed and allowed sufficient drying time, the bottom was carefully offered up to the rest of the engine block and eased into the slotted sides. (As you might have noticed, the 'bottom' also includes the 'front' and 'back' sides as well!) This was a tight fit as you might imagine (very tight actually)Blink but with some persuasion it slid down into position as shown in the two opposite ends pics in Photos 3 and 4. Once in place all that was then required was to fix it down permanently by screwing in the two Type J self tapping screws through the bottom (of the bottom) as shown in Photo 5. These screws are also hidden by the Oil Sump assembly, which will be coming in the next installment.
Until then, stay safe as always and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Crankcase bottom pic1.JPG
Crankcase bottom pic2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Plymouth57
#70 Posted : 19 August 2021 20:33:05

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Photos 1 and 2 show the next pack of parts, number 13 which consists of plastic components to construct the Oil Sump which sits at the very bottom of the engine block, together with the Oil Pump shaft and the Alternator. The parts are shown in Photo 2 and are, clockwise from top left: The Distributor Base, The Alternator Lid and Base, a couple of Type J screws, the Oil Pump Shaft, the Oil Sump, a separate pipe from the sump and finally, the end cap of the Oil Pump Shaft.
The instructions have the end cap for the shaft added on after the shaft has been fixed to the sump but I did it the other way around and added the end cap first as it would be easier to treat everything with the enamel wash that way. The end cap is shown push fitted onto the shaft in Photo 3 and then everything was washed in soapy water and allowed to dry before the Blue-Grey wash was brushed on. The effect of the wash is shown in the following photos with Photos 4 and 5 showing the Oil Pump Shaft, Photos 6 and 7, the Distributor Base, Photos 8 and 9 the Alternator (only the base part is shown washed here, the top part had some ‘extras’ added and as that part goes on later you’ll see them then!) And finally, Photos 10 and 11 illustrate the actual Oil Sump itself. Once the enamel wash had dried, the shaft was fitted on to the sump as shown in Photo 12. This is a simple push fit with two tabs on the shaft fitting into two slots on the sump but once it was fitted in tight I also applied a drop of liquid poly to each of the three ‘boxes’ at the point where they contacted the sump wall. You can make out those areas on the next photo more clearly. Adding the glue there meant it wasn’t visible on the outside of the sump. Photo 13 shows the sump laying upside down on the crankcase bottom just before being push fitted into place. There are two hollow pillars on the inside of the sump, which fit into the two holes in the crankcase (shown by the yellow arrows). Care has to be taken in the pushing down however as there is also a moulded on pipe (shown at a) which has to fit into the corresponding hole in the crankcase (shown at b), this won’t engage cleanly if the sump isn’t held level as it is pushed home! Once it is in, and the sump is fully pushed down, the pipe is fitted in as shown in Photo 14. On the opposite side from the moulded pipe there is another one, which has to be fitted in over the Oil Pump Shaft. This has a single locating peg which goes into the hole in the crankcase shown by the arrow in Photo 15. I didn’t remove the mould lines from this pipe so as not to ruin the chrome finish but I did sand the line down on the rear face, which butts up against the crankshaft as this won’t be seen and also allowed a little glue to be added to the flat face. This was the only slightly loose fitting piece so I also used a little superglue in the locating hole as well. With the little pipe added on, the corner appeared as shown in the final Photo 16.
In the next installment, things get complicated – it’s Distributor time!Blink
Until then, stay safe and Happy Modelling to you All!


Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Oil Pump and Sump pic 1.JPG
Oil Pump and Sump pic 2.JPG
Oil Pump and Sump pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Markwarren
#71 Posted : 20 August 2021 09:37:56

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Nice steady progress, looks excellent. Love Love

Mark
Kev the Modeller
#72 Posted : 21 August 2021 17:09:17

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Making great progress with this Robin, all very neat and tidy and just the right amount of subtlety with your washes to bring out all of that lovely detail but not enough to make it look grubby - which F1 engines most certainly ain't!

Loving that photo of the engine progress thus far in your post #68 btw! Cool ThumpUp

Kev
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Plymouth57
#73 Posted : 26 August 2021 20:41:00

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Many thanks indeed to Mark and Kev!Blushing That blue-grey enamel wash virtually does all the work itself on the kit chrome effect, all that is required is to thin it down a little more with white spirit and either big brush large areas or tiddly brush small details!Cool
Talking of details....
Photo 1 is a snapshot from the Haynes manual on the Ferrari 312 showing the actual Alternator on the engine. This is the first part which differs in detail from it’s appearance in the instructions. In the official instructions the alternator comes in two parts – the base section which is chrome and the upper half, which is entirely gold in colour. On the actual kit part, only the top or lid is gold and the rest of the upper body is chrome. As you can see in this photo, it IS only the top which is gold (although it looks more ‘steel’ in this shot), other pictures in the manual do bring out the gold finish more – so well done to the manufacturers for changing to an even more authentic finish!Cool The gold colour was so close to the Vallejo Metal Colour Gold I used on other parts that I hummed and hah-ed for a long time on whether it was worth the extra bother of re-painting it at all. In the end the ‘Hapeth of Tar’ proverb won the day and so I did re-spray the gold with the Vallejo as seen in Photo 2 with its Frog tape coat on. I then also gave it a coat of the Vallejo Metal Varnish so that I could use the Citadel Shadow Black acrylic wash to accentuate the three screws and central boss as seen in Photo 3 with the upper chrome body washed with the Blue Grey as well. The two halves of the alternator simply push fit together and then the entire alternator push fits down into the Distributor base as illustrated in Photo 4. It is then fixed down permanently by screwing a Type J screw up into the body of the alternator from below as shown in Photo 5. The final ‘improvement’ was to add a tiny decal label to simulate the alternator ID label seen in Photo 1. Somewhere, probably up in the attic I have a cardboard shoe box half full of unused decal sheets – many of them bought years (I mean decades) ago from an advert in the Military Modelling magazine. They were out in the old garage workroom for many years but had survived in very good condition despite the damp winters! My next job is to climb around the attic and find them again (wish I’d left them out there now!Blink ) Anyway, I clambered in to the old workroom and found a box of Italieri 1/48 US Flight deck crew with the decal sheet still inside. I cut out the label that most fitted the bill and applied that to the alternator as shown in Photo 6 with four ‘dots’ of thick aluminium paint to simulate the rivets in each corner. Finally the chrome part of the cylinder including the label got a coat of semi gloss varnish as I was a little suspicious of how the decal came off the backing sheet even before I put it in the Decalfix!
With the alternator securely in place, the next task was to fit on the Distributor itself. The ‘kit finish’ is shown in Photo 7, this piece is a single moulding in a black polythene type plastic (like the 1/72 scale figures from Airfix etc.) To give it a more worn or used appearance I just dry-brushed it with Vallejo Sky Grey to give the result shown in Photo 8. This was actually a little more difficult than I’d expected, the plastic has a slightly ‘oily’ finish though to be honest I didn’t first wash it in soapy water (didn’t think I needed to) and the water based acrylic tended to go on and then get rubbed off by the brush again. I think an enamel-based grey might have gone on easier but I didn’t want to over do it anyway and the result wasn’t too bad. The distributor is simply push fitted into its location on the base and this was the first such fitting that I had to adapt in the kit so far. I found it was just too tight a fit to get the thing to go right down and ended up having to carefully file down the hole by inserting a rat tail diamond dust file and gently rotating it. This allowed the distributor to go down ok but a little on the slack side so after it was in position I added a few drops of super glue around the peg from underneath the base. Although super glue doesn’t normally stick to polythene plastic it did seem to fix it in firmly here and the distributor is shown fixed in position in Photo 9. This section comes with three HT leads and their connectors. However, before commencing to fit them on I needed a little addition! Photo 10, photographed from the Haynes manual again shows the connectors on the distributor and as you can see, each HT lead has an off white ID collar down at the connector’s ‘um, connection! I hunted around for something similar and came up with some electronic wiring of 24/0.2mm with white insulation (my normal 7/0.2mm wire was actually the same diameter as the HT leads themselves so that was no use!) I stripped off a few mm of the insulation as shown in Photo 11 and sliced off thin rings to use as the collars. Now the instructions say to use a wooden cocktail stick to push into the end of the HT lead tubing to widen it slightly before sliding it onto the connector. I tried that method but found that trying to twist the stick to insert it merely twisted the HT lead around with it too. I discovered that it was much easier to use a sharp pointed metal rod like a large darning needle size. As you can see in Photo 12, I first inserted the white ring onto the tip of the needle and pulled it back down the shaft stretching it wider as it went, then the HT lead was pushed onto the metal point for a couple of mm to widen the end. Whilst it was stuck there, the white ring was pushed back down, slipping over the end of the black tube. The HT lead was then removed and a connector inserted into the end before it could return to its former size. Once the connector was on, the white ring was slid up tight to the end of the HT lead right on the connector/lead join. The first three leads, which came with this pack are seen plugged into the distributor in Photo 13. Enter my next boo-boo!Blushing After consulting the instruction photo on the computer screen umpteen times I was convinced that the first three leads were indeed numbers one, two and three and so the ends of their leads were duly inserted onto the metal rods protruding from plugs one, two and three as shown in Photo 14. Each lead has to pass under the gold panel with the air intakes on, passing in front of the trumpet above the HT connection and over the chrome plate beneath it. There they stayed until I began working on Pack 15, which contains the rest of the HT leads and plugs. I knew that the first three leads I fitted in were each 100mm long. In pack 15, we get six more of that length, three of 80mm and a baby one of 35mm. At the end of the instructions is a reminder that plugs one, two and three are 80mm long and the other nine are 100mm – so the three 100mm ones already on couldn’t be one, two and three!Blink After more squinting at the photo I discovered they were actually numbers ten, eleven and twelve! So off came the leads and moved up to the other end of the head as shown in Photo 15 and 16. After that was cleared up it was much easier following the remaining positions ending up with all twelve leads on the distributor as shown in Photo 17. Later on I was to re-arrange the positioning of the connectors to closer approximate the way those leads come springing out from the distributor – even the Haynes manual describes the V12 wiring as “an art form in itself”!
With the completion of the HT leads, that completes the build from Pack 02. In the following installment, we begin Pack 03 with the fuel distribution system (and if I thought the HT leads were complicated, wait till you see this part!!!!)BigGrin
Until then, keep safe and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.

PS: I found this video on Youtube a few days ago – talk about some good reference material!Cool
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96Y1MUkq8PE
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Distributor Assembly pic 1.JPG
Distributor Assembly pic 2.JPG
Distributor Assembly pic 3.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Kev the Modeller
#74 Posted : 31 August 2021 13:56:35

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Nice work as always Robin and some great use of random materials in your scratchbuilt added details. Looking at your first photo from the Haynes manual, I don't think the flat plate on the top of the alternator is gold? It looks like it could just be a reflection from something out of camera shot as the edges of it which face the camera directly are a steel colour? I would also have painted the top and bottom of the alternator a matt aluminium colour leaving just the centre band and the plate in a steel colour as per your reference photo for added realism, but that's just me being obsessed with detail, and I would have also added the two black cables that are attached to that top plate in the manual photo?

Nonetheless, some excellent work as always Robin and already looking forward to seeing how you get on with those complicated fuel lines. Might be worth having a bowl of spaghetti for tea the night before you start just to get you in the mood!? LOL Laugh

keep up the good work and thanks for sharing your build. ThumpUp

Kev
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Plymouth57
#75 Posted : 01 September 2021 20:19:40

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Many thanks for that Kev!BigGrin
Looking at the photo again, I think you are absolutely right - the alternator in that photo IS a steel finish overall, my only excuse is that the original photo in the Haynes book does have more of a 'yellowish' hue on the top than the photo here, even so it still looks more steel as you said, (I couldn't scan the photo as the manual won't open flat enough to get the page on the glass, I had to photograph the page and then crop it down!)Blink
Looking through the rest of the book and also the reference pics I've collected, the great majority of the alternators are all plain steel, of the two that aren't, one is 'goldish' (or at least the same colour as the air intake platform) and the other, just to be different is a gloss black!
The blue oil filter coming soon also seems to come in a variety of colours and finishes!
Funny you should mention spaghetti! In one of my less 'lucid' moments I was seriously considering having a tin of spaghetti or baked beans for tea and stirring some fuel line tubing around in the bottom of the tin to see if it would be stained yellowy-orange to simulate the fuel in the tubes. I then had visions of the engine in years to come being covered in mould growing on the tomato infused fuel lines!BigGrin
Fortunately after some research I came up with a more 'conventional' technique!
Fuel system coming soon!

Robin.
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
roymattblack
#76 Posted : 02 September 2021 08:23:44

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Some really great work in this build. It's looking excellent.
Looking forward to seeing what you do next.Love
Kev the Modeller
#77 Posted : 02 September 2021 14:46:51

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Hahaha!! LOL Laugh

Yeah I'd give up on the idea of spaghetti in tomato sauce for colouring your fuel lines Robin. As you say, you'd very likely end up with furry tubing! Steel braided hoses look beautiful on F1 cars, but vegan fuel lines don't quite portray the right image methinks!? Glare BigGrin

If you want a tip for what to use as coloured fuel lines, have a look at what I used to replicate fuel lines on my Eagle Gurney-Weslake engine at post #45 here:

https://forum.model-spac...sts&t=34575&p=3

They sell these in different colours and I also think they do them in different sized diameters and they are cheap!? You can see how effective they look in my photos. Hope that helps? ThumpUp

Kev
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Plymouth57
#78 Posted : 08 September 2021 21:13:24

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Many thanks again to Roy and Kev for those kind words!
Kev, that coloured tubing is brilliant and many thanks for the info!Cool As you'll see below, I have gone a slightly different path but that's what I get for not having a good look through the various diaries in the car section (still stuck in the diorama/wooden ship mindset by the looks of it!)Blink
Kev's method would have been so much easier and I think the 1.0mm tubing would have been ideal, its a definite thought for others coming after on this kit though!Cursing
Anyway!...
Photos 1 and 2 show Pack 16 and its contents. These consist of a set of four chromed plastic fuel distributors (each one unique in shape) and three sizes of translucent rubbery fuel pipes. Fortunately, the four rings are actually numbered on their lower faces as indicated by the arrow in Photo 3. The rings were washed in soapy water and once dried, given the usual blue-grey enamel wash to leave them looking as in Photo 4. Then it was time to try some experimenting on the rubber tubing to try and simulate the yellow staining that the petrol imparts to nice clean new petrol tubes (see, even I knew that with my years of 50cc moped-ing!) After looking around the internet (everywhere except the diaries on here of course) I found a reference to Tamiya Clear Yellow. Not having any Tamiya paints I did discover that Vallejo did a range of acrylic Transparent colours, so I sent off for a bottle of yellow together with a 1m roll of clear tubing from a very useful supplier on ebay to try out the techniques on, rather than risking the kit items. I thought the supplied tubing was 2mm so that’s what I bought but it turns out it is more like 1.8mm, actually, (after finally checking it with the digital micrometer its more like 1mm)Anyhow, my first efforts using the 2mm tube was to employ a syringe from my inkjet top up set to siphon the yellow paint up through the tube, wait a little while then squirt it back into the bottle, sucking up clean water to reduce the yellow down. This actually worked very well with the clear tubing but was a bit inconsistent with the translucent, proving hard to get a uniform finish. You can see this method in Photo 5 with one piece of tubing yellowed nicely and another on the end of the syringe needle. I then discovered that it wasn’t actually necessary to suck the paint through the tube at all and a more consistent result was obtained by essentially ‘staining’ the outside of the translucent tubing instead. The ‘kit’ to perform this technique is shown in Photo 6 consisting of the bottle of Vallejo Transparent Yellow, a small mixing cup with a few drops of the paint, a selection of 0.5mm wire cut a little longer than the rubber tubing, a soft natural hair brush and one of my silicone rubber house moulds from the Sword Beach diorama!Blink The poly packet contains the first group of rubber tubes from before this photo was taken. The procedure is as follows: take a rubber tube and pass it over the wire (I learned to bend the end over at a right angle later to stop the tube running off the end). Grip the other end of the wire in a crocodile clip on the ‘hand’s free’ gizmo (the ones with a magnifying glass etc) and dip the brush into the yellow paint, giving the entire tube a quick coat, and using the ‘pull’ of the brush to spin the tubing around on the wire to coat all around. Then, quickly suspend the painted tube over the jam jar of water and after cleaning the brush off run all over the tube literally washing most of the paint off again and leaving just a yellowish stain on the exterior of the rubber. This is shown in Photo 7. As for that silicone rubber mould? This was used as a convenient base to push the other end of the wire into to allow the stained tubes to dry off as seen in Photo 8. On some of them, a drop or two of watery paint collected and these were removed with the soft brush to prevent a thicker yellow spot forming. The last two photos, Photos 9 and 10 illustrate the difference between using the translucent tubing ‘as is’ on the left and the yellow stained finish on the right.
In the next installment, all that stained tubing gets installed onto the fuel distributor stack – be warned – there’s a lot of sickly yellow all over the screen to come!BigGrin
Until then, stay safe as always and Happy Modelling to you All!

Robin.
Plymouth57 attached the following image(s):
Fuel Distributor pic 1.JPG
Fuel Distributor pic 2.JPG
First wooden ship: The Grimsby 12 Gun 'Frigate' by Constructo Second: Bounty DelPrado Part Works Third: HMS Victory DelPrado Part Works 1/100 scale
Diorama of the Battle of the Brandywine from the American Revolutionary War Diorama of the Battle of New Falkland (unfinished sci-fi), Great War Centenary Diorama of the Messines Ridge Assault
Index for the Victory diary is on page 1
Kev the Modeller
#79 Posted : 09 September 2021 16:16:08

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Looking good Robin. An interesting method for colouring those fuel lines and they turned out fine, well done.

Looking forward to the next update! Cool ThumpUp

Kev

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roymattblack
#80 Posted : 10 September 2021 08:17:17

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A great way for colouring those fuel lines Robin.
This is going to be a fantastic display piece.Love
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